Walter's Downtown

1120 Naylor Houston,TX 77002

SPECIAL DUTIES, POTATO PIRATES, BLACK COFFEE
Jun
30
8:00 pm20:00

SPECIAL DUTIES, POTATO PIRATES, BLACK COFFEE

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DOORS: 8 PM / ADVANCE TICKETS $12 / ALL AGES

In late 1977, Special Duties was founded by school friends Steve Norris (Aka Steve Duty) Steve Green (Aka Steve Arrogant) and Nigel Baker under the name X-pelled. 

The three were punks who attended the same school, but the idea of forming their own band came when they saw The Adverts in Colchester. The fact that the three schoolboys couldn't play and didn't own any instruments didn't discourage them, as they realised that was not stopping hundreds of bands up and down the country from forming punk groups. 

Initially the boys decided to put Arrogant on vocals, Duty on guitar and Baker on bass and penned two songs "Nothing Out Of Us" and "No Money, No Scandals" which were soon dropped from the set. In the early days the line up changed a few times and saw Baker on Vocals, Arrogant on Guitar and local punks Carl and Paddy given a try out on Guitar and Bass respectively. Sometime later, Stuart Bray joins the band on drums. 

The name of the band was changed from X-pelled to Special Duties when a box of around 200 badges with "Special Duties" printed on them came into their possession after they had allegedly been stolen from a school in Colchester. The band decided they could save money on getting badges made by simply changing their name and so Special Duties was born.

Special Duties have also toured in the US with a tour of the East Coast in 1998 supported by some of the best Punk Bands in the US namely The Casualties, Violent Society, The Virus, The Unseen and Banner of Hope. The finest moment of the tour was getting to play at one of the homes of Punk, CBGB's. A sell out gig with the doors being left open so the punks on the street who couldn't get in at least got to see and hear the band! The show was recorded for the ‘Live at CBGB's' album. The great reaction the band received in the US resulted in the boys touring the West Coast in 2001 supported by Violent Society, Oppressed Logic and some of California's best Punk Bands. 

Since reforming in 1995, six singles have been released plus a further four albums, '77 in 97', ‘The Punk Singles Collection', ‘Live at CBGB's and Get Back Records from Italy released Distorted Truth.

 

MITSKI, JAPANESE BREAKFAST, JAY SOM
Jul
1
8:00 pm20:00

MITSKI, JAPANESE BREAKFAST, JAY SOM

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$10 ADVANCE / $12 DOOR / ALL AGES

Mitski warmly recalls a quote from sculptor El Anatsui, “Art grows out of each particular situation, and I believe that artists are better off working with whatever their environment throws up.” With this nerve exposed lyrically, and having dived into her new beginning, Mitski chooses her 2014 breakthrough album Bury Me at Makeout Creek to explore uncharted sonic territory, trading in large string arrangements for guitar and bass. While studying composition at SUNY Purchase’s music conservatory, she previously recorded music with a full orchestra. However as college graduation inched closer, Mitski moved away from the concert hall and into the campus’ active DIY scene. Upon relocating to New York following graduation, she entered stages at Death By Audio, Silent Barn, and Bed Stuy basements, entrenching her songs of love, fear, lust, and brilliant clarity into entirely sympathetic ears. Since releasing Bury Me at Makeout Creek, Mitski has received international acclaim for her distinct, arresting sound and profoundly reflective lyrics. Pitchfork applauded the release as “inventive and resourceful,” while Rolling Stone celebrated her “deep-cutting lyrics.” NME said of Bury Me, “it’s a record that doesn’t tug at your heart-strings as much as it mercilessly pounds at them, taking to your emotions like a lead pipe to a piñata.” She has also received widespread attention for her “cathartic” live shows as dubbed by The New York Times’ Jon Caramanica. “I was so young when I behaved 25,” Mitski sings on “First Love / Late Spring,” “yet now I find I’ve grown into a tall child.” This veritable thesis speaks to sentiments of the poetry and beauty of struggling up the hill to adulthood. Mitski follows El Anatsui’s humbling advice, cathartically revealing snapshots from her adventures in youth, and the empowerment found in sharing these stories with others. In 2015 Mitski is poised to continue delivering her particular flavor of soul-baring rock, and tour throughout North America and beyond.

Mitski warmly recalls a quote from sculptor El Anatsui, “Art grows out of each particular situation, and I believe that artists are better off working with whatever their environment throws up.”

With this nerve exposed lyrically, and having dived into her new
beginning, Mitski chooses her 2014 breakthrough album Bury Me at Makeout Creek to explore uncharted sonic territory, trading in large string arrangements for guitar and bass. While studying composition at SUNY Purchase’s music conservatory, she previously recorded music with a full orchestra. However as college graduation inched closer, Mitski moved away from the
concert hall and into the campus’ active DIY scene. Upon relocating to New York following graduation, she entered stages at Death By Audio, Silent Barn, and Bed Stuy basements, entrenching her songs of love, fear, lust, and brilliant clarity into entirely sympathetic ears.

Since releasing Bury Me at Makeout Creek, Mitski has
received international acclaim for her distinct, arresting sound and profoundly reflective lyrics. Pitchfork applauded the release as “inventive and resourceful,” while Rolling Stone celebrated her “deep-cutting lyrics.” NME said of Bury Me, “it’s a record that doesn’t tug at your heart-strings as much as it mercilessly pounds at them, taking to your emotions like a lead pipe to a
piñata.” She has also received widespread attention for her “cathartic” live shows as dubbed by The New York Times’ Jon Caramanica.

“I was so young when I behaved 25,” Mitski sings on “First Love / Late Spring,” “yet now I find I’ve grown into a tall child.” This veritable thesis speaks to sentiments of the poetry and beauty of struggling up the hill to adulthood. Mitski follows El Anatsui’s humbling advice, cathartically revealing snapshots from her adventures in youth, and the empowerment found in sharing these stories with others. In 2015 Mitski is poised to continue delivering her particular flavor of soul-baring rock, and tour throughout North America and beyond.

A side project from her work as front woman of Philadelphia indie punk band Little Big League, Michelle Zauner released a tape in June 2013 under the solo moniker Japanese Breakfast. The tape was titled June and boasted thirty tracks written and recorded every day of the month. A stark deviation from Little Big League's guitar-based indie rock, it showcased Zauner's dark lyrics, unique vocals and inherent knack for pop melody. Two bedroom pop cassettes later, Japanese Breakfast returns with its first full-fledged LP and vinyl release, Psychopomp. The album explores Zauner's experimental interests and hosts a wide range of sound: jarring anime samples, minimalist ballads, rhythms and synths reminiscent of Tango in the Night-era Fleetwood Mac paired with the moody intimacy of Mount Eerie. Psychopomp revisits and revamps lo-fi tracks and adds chilling new songs to fall in love with.

A side project from her work as front woman of Philadelphia indie punk band Little Big League, Michelle Zauner released a tape in June 2013 under the solo moniker Japanese Breakfast. The tape was titled June and boasted thirty tracks written and recorded every day of the month. A stark deviation from Little Big League's guitar-based indie rock, it showcased Zauner's dark lyrics, unique vocals and inherent knack for pop melody. Two bedroom pop cassettes later, Japanese Breakfast returns with its first full-fledged LP and vinyl release, Psychopomp. The album explores Zauner's experimental interests and hosts a wide range of sound: jarring anime samples, minimalist ballads, rhythms and synths reminiscent of Tango in the Night-era Fleetwood Mac paired with the moody intimacy of Mount Eerie. Psychopomp revisits and revamps lo-fi tracks and adds chilling new songs to fall in love with.

Jay Som is the moniker of San Francisco-based musician Melina Duterte who makes a unique style of alternative pop music. In late November 2015 Jay Som released a collection of finished & unfinished songs titled "Turn Into" which has been described as peaceful and energetic. 

KING KHAN & THE SHRINES, GIORGIO MURDERER, ELI WINTER
Jul
2
8:00 pm20:00

KING KHAN & THE SHRINES, GIORGIO MURDERER, ELI WINTER

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$16 ADVANCE / $18 DAY OF / ALL AGES / 8 PM

King Khan and the Shrines have been stunning audiences for nearly two decades with their unique mix of pure old school R&B mixed with a heavy dose of pure psychedelic majesty and unhinged, wild, frantic rock n' roll. Imagine, if you will, a screamin' Bollywood Wilson Pickett hanging out in Andy Warhol's factory dropping LSD in his eyes and wearing a shiny golden cape that wraps around the world, or simply picture the love child of Anubis and Kali drinking milk straight from Ganesha's trunk. King Khan & The Shrines is more than just psychedelic soul band they are a legendary cult musical phenomenon with more than 15 years of international touring, four studio records and a fan base of fervent punk rockers, soul music lovers, free jazz tea heads and garage rock officianados.

King Khan, the spiritual guru and front man, cobbled together a fierce line-up of musicians in between reading his own self-made Tarot cards (WHO DOES THAT?) and raising a family. What he first created in 1999 is still one of the most entertaining groups the world has seen and heard since the days of Ike & Tina. He isn't known as the "Indian James Brown" for nothing! The line-up of the Shrines includes Chicago-born, Ron Streeter (veteran percussionist for Curtis Mayfield, Stevie Wonder), a horn section consisting of trumpeter Simon Wojan (from Cloudland Canyon), tenor sax man Ben Ra (Germany's John Coltrane), and french baritone saxophonist Big Fred Brissaud. The rhythm section of the Sensational Shrines has been called a German/French version of the Freak Brothers - Till "Mr. Speedfinger" Timm on guitar, organist Fredovitch from Bordeaux, Big Baby Jeans Riddiman on bass and the most stoic drummer in show business, John Boy Adonis.

Their first album Three Hairs & You're Mine was produced by Liam Watson, recorded in the legendary Toe Rag Studios in London and released in 2002. A second full-length, Mr. Supernatural, followed in 2004. King Khan & The Shrines soon became an all-star international movement. Hundreds of gigs followed all across Europe, Australia and North America. They headlined Toronto's NXNE festival 2006 playing three nights in a row and had Dave Davies, trombone player of the Sun Ra Arkestra join their brass section.

In 2007, King Khan made the soundtrack and film score for "Schwarze Schafe", a German film directed by Oliver Rihs. King Khan then released What Is?!, receiving critical acclaim from all over the world. It landed at #33 on Pitchfork's Top Albums of 2007, while their track "Welfare Bread" landed at #66 on Pitchfork's Top 100 Songs of 2007.

Their greatest hits, aptly titled "The Supreme Genius of King Khan & The Shrines"' came out in 2008 on Vice Records and for the first time their music was widely available in the U.S.

King Khan & The Shrines have played at several notable festivals including ATP, Coachella, Sasquatch, Pitchfork, South By Southwest and Sudoste. King Khan was even invited to play guitar for Wu Tang Clan's GZA, where he received his wu-name from him, "Lord Khan". King Khan was invited by Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson to perform with his other project with Mark Sultan in the "King Khan & BBQ Show" at the Sydney Opera House as a part of the Vivid festival in 2010.

The music of King Khan and the Shrines has been heard in many popular American TV programs (NBC's Chuck, HBO's Entourage, HBO's Eastbound & Down which was supervised by Wayne Kramer of the MC5). Khan also recently provided an original film score for Miron Zownir's film "Back To Nothing" starring Meret Becker, Birol Unel and Milton Welsh.

In 2014 King Khan was asked by John B. Smith (founding member and leader of The Invaders) to provide the soundtrack for a documentary film about the Memphis black power group. The Invaders soundtrack will be released in four singles; two on Khan's own label imprint called "Khannibalism", one on Merge Records and one featuring the artwork of Shepard Fairley on Obey Records all of which will be available in the summer of 2016.

During the time Khan was working on this film soundtrack he had a vision to create a deck of tarot cards that celebrates black power. He recruited Belfast artist Michael Eaton (Game of Thrones) and together they created the Black Power Tarot deck, under the supervision of surrealistic film maker Alejandro Jodorowsky thus fulfilling Khan's long time dream of becoming one of Jodo's "spiritual warriors".

In 2015 King Khan co-produced an album along side Hal Willner and James Grauerholz of William S. Burroughs reading "the unspeakable parts" of his infamous book "Naked Lunch". Khan and Bill Frisell among other Naked City musicians provided the music to accompany the twenty year old recitations. The album entitled "Let Me Hang You" will be released on Khannibalism later this year.

King Khan and the Shrines are currently on tour in Europe in March and will touring all over the United States this summer in June where they will headline along side The Mummies and Real Kids at the next Burger Boogaloo hosted by John Waters and Tracy Lords.

FEA, TALK SICK BRATS, GIANT KITTY, TURNAWAYS
Jul
15
8:00 pm20:00

FEA, TALK SICK BRATS, GIANT KITTY, TURNAWAYS

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8 pm / $7 Advance / $10 Door / All Ages

Fea is the continued ferocity of Girl In A Coma’s Phanie Diaz and Jenn Alva, joined by lead vocalist Letty Martinez and guitarist Aaron Magana. Their melodic brand of riot grrrl chicana punk immediately caught the ear of many iconic collaborators, such as Joan Jett who signed them to Blackheart Records. Fea soon joined legendary, hard-rocking Babes In Toyland on their nation-wide reunion tour; Babes drummer Lori Barbero producing their first release, 'Zine EP,' which comes out on Blackheart April 22. For their full-length LP landing July 15, subsequent producers have been Laura Jane Grace, fearless leader of prolific punk band Against Me!, and Alice Bag of The Bags, an early innovator of the L.A. punk scene— all of whom perfectly compliment the band’s fierce exploration of societal, cultural and gender-related issues.  With all cylinders ablaze, Fea is a truly unique riot grrrl resurgence out of San Antonio, TX.

Fea is the continued ferocity of Girl In A Coma’s Phanie Diaz and Jenn Alva, joined by lead vocalist Letty Martinez and guitarist Aaron Magana. Their melodic brand of riot grrrl chicana punk immediately caught the ear of many iconic collaborators, such as Joan Jett who signed them to Blackheart Records. Fea soon joined legendary, hard-rocking Babes In Toyland on their nation-wide reunion tour; Babes drummer Lori Barbero producing their first release, 'Zine EP,' which comes out on Blackheart April 22. For their full-length LP landing July 15, subsequent producers have been Laura Jane Grace, fearless leader of prolific punk band Against Me!, and Alice Bag of The Bags, an early innovator of the L.A. punk scene— all of whom perfectly compliment the band’s fierce exploration of societal, cultural and gender-related issues.  With all cylinders ablaze, Fea is a truly unique riot grrrl resurgence out of San Antonio, TX.

RABIT, SUPRAMAN, JOSIAH GABRIEL, FUTURE BLONDES
Jul
30
8:00 pm20:00

RABIT, SUPRAMAN, JOSIAH GABRIEL, FUTURE BLONDES

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DOORS: 8 PM / SHOW: 10 PM / ALL AGES / $12 ADVANCE / $15 DAY OF

Houston-based producer Rabit is helping stoke what The New Yorker has called "the resurgence of grime." Rabit has released Baptizm, Sunshowers, Terminator, Double Dragon, and the Sunshowers EP. His highly praised debut album Communion was released in late 2015.

DRESSY BESSY, GIANT KITTY, EL LAGO, ROSE ETTE
Aug
5
8:00 pm20:00

DRESSY BESSY, GIANT KITTY, EL LAGO, ROSE ETTE

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DOORS: 8 PM / $7 ADVANCE / $10 DOOR / ALL AGES

DRESSY BESSY is an indie rock group drom Denver, Colorado. Asociated with the Elepehant Six collective, guitarist John Hill also played with The Apples in Stereo. The group is well known for their contributions to the soundtrack of "But I'm a Cheerleader..."

DRESSY BESSY is an indie rock group drom Denver, Colorado. Asociated with the Elepehant Six collective, guitarist John Hill also played with The Apples in Stereo. The group is well known for their contributions to the soundtrack of "But I'm a Cheerleader..."

"...refreshingly old-school, dancing across the grey area between New Wave, pop-punk, and straight-up pop... what might’ve happened if L7 had been produced by Ric Ocasek back when The Cars were at their peak" -Space City Rocks

"...refreshingly old-school, dancing across the grey area between New Wave, pop-punk, and straight-up pop... what might’ve happened if L7 had been produced by Ric Ocasek back when The Cars were at their peak" -Space City Rocks

CRO-MAGS, CONFUSED, THUG BOOTS, IDIOT CITY
Aug
7
7:00 pm19:00

CRO-MAGS, CONFUSED, THUG BOOTS, IDIOT CITY

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DOORS: 7 PM / ALL AGES / $15 ADVANCE / $18 DAY OF

In the Year 2000, Cro-Mags have become an urban legend. Their story told and retold, twisted and warped until it is unrecognizable. But now to set the record straight, this is how it all be began. Before the Quarrel. Picture this, the year 1980, it's sunrise on NYC's lower east side, Ave. A is a barren urban wasteland of empty storefronts in abandoned buildings. the streets are littered with junkies and freaks. Heroin and cocaine are the only flourishing businesses and the only sign of life in this ghost town are the local gangs and 40 or so kids in front of A 7 (hardcore club) where Urban Waste is still on stage. Little Chris, age 11, and Eric Casanova, age 12, sit on the curb still tripping from the night before, with no money, no hope and no future, just drive and dried blood on their clothes from a night they've already forgotten. This was hardcore and the streets were ours. Across from Tompkins Square Park Parris Mayhew and Harley Flanagan are sitting in the back booth of the Park Inn Tavern (after-hours) pounding pitchers of beer and shots of Jack, planning their new band. Nothing unusual, except that Parris was16 and Harley was 14 and their band was to change the hardcore scene forever. In the bar, Harley is recounting to Parris the details of a robbery he and Paul Dordal had perpetrated earlier that day. As Parris sits listening and looking into Harley's drunk, drugged and crazed eyes that seem to pierce the darkness, Parris thinks "What am I getting myself into?" That was really the beginning. There was no blueprint for hardcore, no one to teach them how, they were all just kids living their lives, making it up as they went along, inventing hardcore with every step they took. Harley was a 6th grade dropout, though at age 14 was already a veteran Parrismusician, child star of the punk scene, America's first skinhead and the notorious former drummer of NYC's premier punk band, "The Stimulators." In "The Stims" Harley brought a powerful youthful presence to an aging punk scene. He kicked the doors wide open for other kids his age to come on the scene and follow his example to be a youthful creative force like the "Beastie Boys" and Jill and Gabby of "Luscious Jackson." Adam Yauch was at one point considered to play bass with the Cro-Mags, but was about to attend Bard College. Harley left "The Stims" to create a harder, more aggressive style of music, capturing the true hardcore lifestyle. Depicting the violence, poverty and urban decay of the streets of the lower east side in the early 8o's. Harley's personal influence and mere presence on the scene defined the transition between the old punk scene and the new hardcore scene. Parris, a 16 year old unknown musician and an art student attending the High School of Art & Design was forever changed by the sounds of the Sex Pistols and Motorhead. Then drawn into the local NYC punk scene by the Stimulators and Bad Brains, Parris joined punk icons "The Mad," playing bass. But soon left the band setting his sights on starting his own band, playing his music. Paul Dordal recommended Harley and Parris team-up. They had their first jam at Harley's aunt Denise's apartment on Avenue A. Denise was the guitarist of the Stimulators. Parris played the riffs that were to become (with Harley's lyrics), the Harley and Parrisfirst Cro-Mags song "World Peace" and the templates for the Cro-Mags' sound. After a few minutes of playing, Denise turned to Harley and said "Where did you find this kid?" But Harley was way ahead of her. he immediately recognized similarities in Parris' approach to his own that were uncanny. A musical mirror image. These two kids couldn't have been more different, but their songs seemed to belong together as if they came from the same source. How could two kids from such different worlds create such a similarly Cro-Mag-Nonimous sound? That was the beginning of a life long musical collaboration that is as formidable today with their new CD "REVENGE" as it was when they first met. So, Parris and Harley began hanging out, planning, writing songs and doing a lot of drinking. They became friends fast, but finding other musicians was difficult., so in the interim Harley played drums with Murphy's Law, helped them write their first album and even came up with their name. Harley was eventually replaced by future Cro-Mags drummer Pete Hines who left Murphy's Law and joined the Cro-Mags to support the" Age of Quarrel" LP and to later record the "Best Wishes" LP. Harley grew impatient and hitchhiked across the country to California. With no money and nowhere to stay Harley just lived day to day, hand to mouth, sampling the California punk scene and definitely gave them a taste of what NYC was about to unleash. Harley the teenage tattooed terror created notoriety everywhere he went, fighting, fucking and consuming mass quantities of drugs and alcohol along the way and he was still only 15 years old. In San Francisco, Harley lived in an abandoned brewery called the "Vats," home of many San Francisco punks. Then he hitchhiked back East and North to Canada. He ran with skinheads there, basically reeking havoc everywhere he went, building on his already formidable reputation. These times and Harley's life in NYC, living in burnt out buildings, squats and on the streets, was the life that would be the true inspiration behind the Cro-Mags lyrics. Raw, honest truth, a lifestyle that pulled no punches in the urban decay that was the early 80's untamed streets, where violence, gangs and drugs were a way of life and music would be the only escape for this teenage rebel. He not only lived the truly hardcore way of life, he set the standard an created a legend that still lives. Harley then returned to NYC with a renewed fire to pick up where he an Parris had left off, and a tattoo covering the chest of the devil grabbing the earth. During this long foundation period Parris continued to pound out riffs and songs Cro-Mags, circa: 1985like "Malfunction." He also completed high school and two years of college at the School of Visual Arts Film School. Parris would eventually put these skills to work directing the Cro-Mags video "We Gotta Know" and many others such as Onyx's "Slam" and Type O Negative's "Black #1. But Parris never lost sight of his plan for him and Harley to create the band that would become synonymous with hardcore. Soon after Harley's return to NYC he was given the opportunity to record 4 songs of his own in which he played all the instruments. These recordings were never released but are soon to be on Cro-Mags Recordings. Harley also played drums in a band called "Mode of Ignorance" (MOI) with future Cro-Mags' john Bloodclot and Doug Holland which faded as Cro-Mags began to take shape. Harley turned down offers to drum for the Misfits, and during the first of HR's solo ventures, Bad Brains management approached Harley to front the Bad Brains but Harley passed because finally after 3 years of writing, drinking and generally causing chaos, the search for musicians for the lineup of "NYC's Hardest Band" was complete. It is a little known fact that John Joseph was not a founding member of the Cro-Mags or even the original singer. He was not! In 1984, 15 year old Eric Casanova became the first singer of the Cro-Mags and Harley at CBGBco-wrote, with Harley, classic Cro-Mag lyrics such as "Hard Times," "Street Justice," "Survival of the Streets," and Eric's own "Life of My Own," based on the lives they led. With the hired services of Mackie on Drums, the Cro-Mags played their first gig at CBGB's with Government Issue. A highly anticipated gig being Harley Flanagan's new band. Then after their second show, for personal reasons, Eric left the band and began a revolving door of musicians that Parris an Harley watched some and go for the entire life of their musical partnership. But Eric's contribution to the Cro-Mags in that short time is undeniable, those first songs were the foundation that defined the Cro-Mags' sound and lyrical content and those first shows made a tremendous impact. The punk scene was shaken by the force of the Cro-Mags and the momentum was unstoppable. Next the band recruited john Bloodclot (age 21) on vocals to replace Eric, and after only tow shows began headlining gigs. Overnight Cro-Mags had dominated the hardcore scene in NYC. As Kabula of Agnostic Front said, "We've toured everywhere and nobody's doing what the Cro-Mags are doin', it's totally new." The transition between Eric and John was seamless. John's lyrics fit perfectly with Harley and Eric's and John brought a dynamic presence to the front man position that helped to define the image of the band. Though John's presence in the band ultimately was the undoing of the Cro-Mags. So with 3 years of writing, a solid foundation of songs already in the band's repertoire, along with music from Harley's never released solo recording including "Don't Tread on Me," the Cro-Mags needed only a few more songs to complete the now classic set list. Those songs were completed with John Joseph and on November 2, 1984, and on February 16, 1985 the Cro-Mags went into High Five Studios and recorded 12 songs. That moment in time when four very different freaks got together to make music was historic. The recordings made in that session were simply the blue print for all hardcore that followed and set the stage for the definitive hardcore album of all time, "The Age of Quarrel." John and Harley with Billy Milano This CD, now poignantly titled "Before the Quarrel" captured the raw fire that circumstances had created by bringing this unlikely group together. These recordings are revered as the pinnacle moment of the Cro-Mags and the favorite recordings of Cro-Mags fans. Harley, Parris, John and Mackie not only made their mark deep in the history of hard music but made a sound that changed it forever. Obviously God didn't bring these guys together to be friends, it was to make hardcore music. The now infamously volatile relationship between these four people turned ugly in the end but not one of them could look back at these recordings with anything but pride. No words could ever fully describe that time especially not now, so many years later, so many clone bands come and gone. But this music and these words were N.Y.C.H. at it's best, honest, aggressive and true. This CD captured it, the lifestyle that many talk about, but few ever really lived. The Cro-Mags "Before the Quarrell" was the beginning, the genuine article and this recording is the proof. They were trulyCro-Mag-nonimus! To be continued . . .

In the Year 2000, Cro-Mags have become an urban legend. Their story told and retold, twisted and warped until it is unrecognizable. But now to set the record straight, this is how it all be began. Before the Quarrel.

Picture this, the year 1980, it's sunrise on NYC's lower east side, Ave. A is a barren urban wasteland of empty storefronts in abandoned buildings. the streets are littered with junkies and freaks. Heroin and cocaine are the only flourishing businesses and the only sign of life in this ghost town are the local gangs and 40 or so kids in front of A 7 (hardcore club) where Urban Waste is still on stage. Little Chris, age 11, and Eric Casanova, age 12, sit on the curb still tripping from the night before, with no money, no hope and no future, just drive and dried blood on their clothes from a night they've already forgotten. This was hardcore and the streets were ours.

Across from Tompkins Square Park Parris Mayhew and Harley Flanagan are sitting in the back booth of the Park Inn Tavern (after-hours) pounding pitchers of beer and shots of Jack, planning their new band. Nothing unusual, except that Parris was16 and Harley was 14 and their band was to change the hardcore scene forever.

In the bar, Harley is recounting to Parris the details of a robbery he and Paul Dordal had perpetrated earlier that day. As Parris sits listening and looking into Harley's drunk, drugged and crazed eyes that seem to pierce the darkness, Parris thinks "What am I getting myself into?"

That was really the beginning. There was no blueprint for hardcore, no one to teach them how, they were all just kids living their lives, making it up as they went along, inventing hardcore with every step they took. Harley was a 6th grade dropout, though at age 14 was already a veteran Parrismusician, child star of the punk scene, America's first skinhead and the notorious former drummer of NYC's premier punk band, "The Stimulators." In "The Stims" Harley brought a powerful youthful presence to an aging punk scene. He kicked the doors wide open for other kids his age to come on the scene and follow his example to be a youthful creative force like the "Beastie Boys" and Jill and Gabby of "Luscious Jackson." Adam Yauch was at one point considered to play bass with the Cro-Mags, but was about to attend Bard College.

Harley left "The Stims" to create a harder, more aggressive style of music, capturing the true hardcore lifestyle. Depicting the violence, poverty and urban decay of the streets of the lower east side in the early 8o's. Harley's personal influence and mere presence on the scene defined the transition between the old punk scene and the new hardcore scene.

Parris, a 16 year old unknown musician and an art student attending the High School of Art & Design was forever changed by the sounds of the Sex Pistols and Motorhead. Then drawn into the local NYC punk scene by the Stimulators and Bad Brains, Parris joined punk icons "The Mad," playing bass. But soon left the band setting his sights on starting his own band, playing his music.

Paul Dordal recommended Harley and Parris team-up. They had their first jam at Harley's aunt Denise's apartment on Avenue A. Denise was the guitarist of the Stimulators. Parris played the riffs that were to become (with Harley's lyrics), the Harley and Parrisfirst Cro-Mags song "World Peace" and the templates for the Cro-Mags' sound. After a few minutes of playing, Denise turned to Harley and said "Where did you find this kid?" But Harley was way ahead of her. he immediately recognized similarities in Parris' approach to his own that were uncanny. A musical mirror image. These two kids couldn't have been more different, but their songs seemed to belong together as if they came from the same source. How could two kids from such different worlds create such a similarly Cro-Mag-Nonimous sound?

That was the beginning of a life long musical collaboration that is as formidable today with their new CD "REVENGE" as it was when they first met.

So, Parris and Harley began hanging out, planning, writing songs and doing a lot of drinking. They became friends fast, but finding other musicians was difficult., so in the interim Harley played drums with Murphy's Law, helped them write their first album and even came up with their name. Harley was eventually replaced by future Cro-Mags drummer Pete Hines who left Murphy's Law and joined the Cro-Mags to support the" Age of Quarrel" LP and to later record the "Best Wishes" LP.

Harley grew impatient and hitchhiked across the country to California. With no money and nowhere to stay Harley just lived day to day, hand to mouth, sampling the California punk scene and definitely gave them a taste of what NYC was about to unleash. Harley the teenage tattooed terror created notoriety everywhere he went, fighting, fucking and consuming mass quantities of drugs and alcohol along the way and he was still only 15 years old. In San Francisco, Harley lived in an abandoned brewery called the "Vats," home of many San Francisco punks. Then he hitchhiked back East and North to Canada. He ran with skinheads there, basically reeking havoc everywhere he went, building on his already formidable reputation.

These times and Harley's life in NYC, living in burnt out buildings, squats and on the streets, was the life that would be the true inspiration behind the Cro-Mags lyrics. Raw, honest truth, a lifestyle that pulled no punches in the urban decay that was the early 80's untamed streets, where violence, gangs and drugs were a way of life and music would be the only escape for this teenage rebel. He not only lived the truly hardcore way of life, he set the standard an created a legend that still lives.

Harley then returned to NYC with a renewed fire to pick up where he an Parris had left off, and a tattoo covering the chest of the devil grabbing the earth.

During this long foundation period Parris continued to pound out riffs and songs Cro-Mags, circa: 1985like "Malfunction." He also completed high school and two years of college at the School of Visual Arts Film School. Parris would eventually put these skills to work directing the Cro-Mags video "We Gotta Know" and many others such as Onyx's "Slam" and Type O Negative's "Black #1. But Parris never lost sight of his plan for him and Harley to create the band that would become synonymous with hardcore.
Soon after Harley's return to NYC he was given the opportunity to record 4 songs of his own in which he played all the instruments. These recordings were never released but are soon to be on Cro-Mags Recordings.

Harley also played drums in a band called "Mode of Ignorance" (MOI) with future Cro-Mags' john Bloodclot and Doug Holland which faded as Cro-Mags began to take shape. Harley turned down offers to drum for the Misfits, and during the first of HR's solo ventures, Bad Brains management approached Harley to front the Bad Brains but Harley passed because finally after 3 years of writing, drinking and generally causing chaos, the search for musicians for the lineup of "NYC's Hardest Band" was complete.

It is a little known fact that John Joseph was not a founding member of the Cro-Mags or even the original singer. He was not!

In 1984, 15 year old Eric Casanova became the first singer of the Cro-Mags and Harley at CBGBco-wrote, with Harley, classic Cro-Mag lyrics such as "Hard Times," "Street Justice," "Survival of the Streets," and Eric's own "Life of My Own," based on the lives they led. With the hired services of Mackie on Drums, the Cro-Mags played their first gig at CBGB's with Government Issue. A highly anticipated gig being Harley Flanagan's new band.

Then after their second show, for personal reasons, Eric left the band and began a revolving door of musicians that Parris an Harley watched some and go for the entire life of their musical partnership.
But Eric's contribution to the Cro-Mags in that short time is undeniable, those first songs were the foundation that defined the Cro-Mags' sound and lyrical content and those first shows made a tremendous impact. The punk scene was shaken by the force of the Cro-Mags and the momentum was unstoppable.

Next the band recruited john Bloodclot (age 21) on vocals to replace Eric, and after only tow shows began headlining gigs. Overnight Cro-Mags had dominated the hardcore scene in NYC. As Kabula of Agnostic Front said, "We've toured everywhere and nobody's doing what the Cro-Mags are doin', it's totally new."

The transition between Eric and John was seamless. John's lyrics fit perfectly with Harley and Eric's and John brought a dynamic presence to the front man position that helped to define the image of the band. Though John's presence in the band ultimately was the undoing of the Cro-Mags.

So with 3 years of writing, a solid foundation of songs already in the band's repertoire, along with music from Harley's never released solo recording including "Don't Tread on Me," the Cro-Mags needed only a few more songs to complete the now classic set list. Those songs were completed with John Joseph and on November 2, 1984, and on February 16, 1985 the Cro-Mags went into High Five Studios and recorded 12 songs.

That moment in time when four very different freaks got together to make music was historic. The recordings made in that session were simply the blue print for all hardcore that followed and set the stage for the definitive hardcore album of all time, "The Age of Quarrel." John and Harley with Billy Milano This CD, now poignantly titled "Before the Quarrel" captured the raw fire that circumstances had created by bringing this unlikely group together. These recordings are revered as the pinnacle moment of the Cro-Mags and the favorite recordings of Cro-Mags fans.

Harley, Parris, John and Mackie not only made their mark deep in the history of hard music but made a sound that changed it forever. Obviously God didn't bring these guys together to be friends, it was to make hardcore music.

The now infamously volatile relationship between these four people turned ugly in the end but not one of them could look back at these recordings with anything but pride. No words could ever fully describe that time especially not now, so many years later, so many clone bands come and gone. But this music and these words were N.Y.C.H. at it's best, honest, aggressive and true. This CD captured it, the lifestyle that many talk about, but few ever really lived.

The Cro-Mags "Before the Quarrell" was the beginning, the genuine article and this recording is the proof.

They were trulyCro-Mag-nonimus!

To be continued . . .

ROSELIT BONE, SON OF BITCH
Aug
9
8:00 pm20:00

ROSELIT BONE, SON OF BITCH

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DOORS: 8 PM / $7 ADVANCE / $10 DOOR / ALL AGES

"Though singer Josh McCaslin wrote much of Roselit Bone's debut album while living in the isolated woods outside Coos Bay, the imagery on Blacken & Curl is the stuff of a dystopian Western: dust blankets the landscape, the ravens are the size of dogs, and death comes slow and hot. The music, played by a 10-piece band augmented by trumpets, flute and pedal steel, enhances the dry, desiccated feeling, blending the cinematic sweep of Ennio Morricone with the twang of classic country and a sense of creeping malice that would make Nick Cave giddy. Bring water. You're going to feel parched." - Matt Singer, Willamette Week

MAXAM, GANESHA, EMPTY SHELLS
Aug
12
8:00 pm20:00

MAXAM, GANESHA, EMPTY SHELLS

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DOORS: 8 pm / $7 advance / $10 Day of / ALL AGES

A Review from The Musical Junkie:
"Downer"

This band from Houston, Texas has nailed the lost art of 90's alternative rock and sprinkled it with a littler flavor of classic rock. Ricky Dee brings brings out a noisy tone from his guitar and sings in a mixture of their influences. Noe Kimes has excellent fills pouring out of his bass which many bassists don't succeed in. Sammy Reyna bring a very tight and organic feel to the band, he is trained in afro cuban and jazz rhythms so playing this type of rock&roll is a very enjoyable experience for him. On their Reverbnation account there's a song Three, Listen to it to understand how amazing the drummer really is. "Brief Conclusions" has a strong "Velvet Underground" influence especially in the laid back vocal melody sung in the style of Lou Reed. "Wake Up" is a noisy Mudhoney inspired jam. The song is layered completely with a loud fuzzy bass. "Kocaine" starts with a subtle bass line and then it's thrown into a fast current of a wild river. There's a solo that might melt your ears. "That Day Long" is a really catchy 80's punk rock like gem. The vocals are sung in a "Hendrix" manner. The bassist really shines on this track. "Downer" has found a way to pay tribute to their influence and make original music at the same time. They don't fall pray into sounding like a copycat band. If you feel nostalgic of the rock music of the 90's this is the band to check out. ~The Musical Junkie~


It is called "Downer" with quotations because every quote is open to interpretation, such is life.

DEERHOOF, COWTOWN (U.K), TELE NOVELLA
Aug
14
8:00 pm20:00

DEERHOOF, COWTOWN (U.K), TELE NOVELLA

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DOORS: 8 PM / $12 ADVANCE / $15 DOOR / ALL AGES

Satomi Matsuzaki plays bass and sings, Greg Saunier plays drums, John Dieterich and Ed Rodriguez play guitars. But what is Deerhoof really? Hell if we know. Pitchfork went so far as to label Deerhoof as "the best band in the world.” The New York Times described them as “one of the most original rock bands to have come along in the last decade.” From their humble beginnings as an obscure San Francisco noise act, they've become one of indie music's most influential bands with their ecstatic and unruly take on pop.

Satomi Matsuzaki plays bass and sings, Greg Saunier plays drums, John Dieterich and Ed Rodriguez play guitars.

But what is Deerhoof really? Hell if we know.

Pitchfork went so far as to label Deerhoof as "the best band in the world.” The New York Times described them as “one of the most original rock bands to have come along in the last decade.”

From their humble beginnings as an obscure San Francisco noise act, they've become one of indie music's most influential bands with their ecstatic and unruly take on pop.

RUBY THE RABBITFOOT, CAMERA CULT, THE RADIO BROADCAST
Aug
19
8:00 pm20:00

RUBY THE RABBITFOOT, CAMERA CULT, THE RADIO BROADCAST

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8 PM / $7 ADVANCE / $10 DOOR / ALL AGES

Not many people can take something as devastating and tumultuous as a breakup and turn it into an album thick with joyous beats, infectious melodies and lyrics that spin disappointment and desolation into revelatory moments, but Ruby The RabbitFoot is not someone who sees things in simple black and white. On her third album, Divorce Party, she creates a vivid world that stretches far beyond just the songs – from videos that straddle the line of performance and art, to her fearless use of fashion, to the music itself, which serves as the thrilling, creative center to her unique universe. Produced by Andy LeMaster (Bright Eyes, Azure Ray), Divorce Party is celebration of life after loss, and the creative renewal that comes from finding light amongst the darkness.

"I want this to be a soundtrack for anyone going through a transition," says Ruby – though this album was written after a particular romantic one, she's not the kind of artist who stays stagnant, anyhow. For this record, she immersed herself deeply into pop music and hip-hop, listening constantly to everything from Beyoncé to Taylor Swift and Fiona Apple. "Having your heart broken is something that humans all experience," she ads. "It's how you learn, and how you grow.”

Beginning with "Beach Flowers," the first song she wrote for the LP and which also kicks of the album, Divorce Party is thick with unusual percussion, shimmering synth licks and ethereal orchestration courtesy of a more experimental approach to instrumentals. "I built you up into a castle in my brain," Ruby sings in her crystalline vocals, "and though it's made of sand, I like making plans just the same." For the Georgia-born artist, the idea of a "beach flower" came to represent how some experiences are as lovely as they are ephemeral – but that doesn't make them any less worthy of enjoyment. "A beach flower is something beautiful and temporary," she explains. "You wouldn't plant all your flowers on the beach unless you wanted the ocean to gobble them up."

The process of creating Divorce Party took nearly two years from start to finish – after 2014's New As Dew, she embarked on a artistic journey that took her everywhere from Georgia to California, where she met collaborator Natalie Neal, who became an instrumental partner in expressing her vision. Neal, a renowned avant-garde director and photographer who has screened her work at Sundance Film Festival, made the ideal match for Ruby. Together, they have been developing the visual palate for Divorce Party, including its stunning first video for "Beach Flowers."

Ruby’s creative expression knows no bounds and her vibrant personality and unique style have led to a host of exciting collaborations as musicians, apparel brands and various creatives have all sought her out to collaborate. One of Urban Outfitter's "Five To Watch In Athens" and hand-picked by Japanese magazine Nero, for a photo spread, Ruby delights in flirting with the fashion world and is just as creative with her image as she is with her music. Ruby made her acting debut in 2014 as Macklemore's love interest in the highly popular video for Fences' single "Arrows," featuring Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. To create Divorce Party, Ruby took the songs down to Athens, Georgia with LeMaster, working with an innovative goal in mind and a new, playful approach to composition. "I wanted more of a pop-sounding record," she says. "I'm a songwriter first and foremost, and I think in the past it's been my nature to pick up the guitar. But in my free time, I love pop music and rap music and R&B. So I had a heavier hand in the style I wanted this time. I learned how to make beats, and learned so much from working with Andy. He has the same love of pop music, and is fearless."

That love is clear in songs like "Faucet Love" and "Ancil," which both manage to be stirring and addictive, melding the stickiness of a pop record with experimentation – via unexpected horns or skittish rhythm - that could only be tackled by someone who knows no real boundaries. And then there are also moments like "Wish," with a slow-burned eighties vibe, that puts on full display the complexities within her vocal range. On “I Hate You” Ruby marries beats and an upbeat melody with some deeply cutting lyrics: “If I ever see your name in lights I think I'll melon ball my eyes out/ Mail them to you overnight with a note that says/"Surprise! Remember when you used to swim for miles and miles in these baby blues?/I wish you would have drowned, cause I hate you/Oh I do.” "That breakup was challenging, but I'm good for it," she says. "I learned so much about love, and I am writing and singing better than I ever have. So I'd like to thank my ex.” “Even though there's this connotation of disruption and heartbreak, divorce parties have a celebratory energy. Every person that we love teaches us, so when it's time to part ways I think it's beautiful to appreciate everything we've gained from the experience. I wrote these songs in a period of separation from a love. I want to release them into the world as a celebration of all that I learned during that time. It's my Divorce Party!”

PORCHES
Sep
10
8:00 pm20:00

PORCHES

TICKETS GO ON SALE FRIDAY, JULY 1ST!

When Aaron Maine looks back on his early work as Porches, he’s often struck by how sad and angry it can feel. “That music turned out a lot more pessimistic than I intended it to be,” he says. “But when I took a sad moment and turned it into a song, it was a cathartic, positive, and clean process. For me, those moments were victories. Feeling better,” he adds, “was making a song.” As it turns out, Maine is very good at making songs. Over the last few years, the 27-year-old singer and songwriter has released a wealth of material on a number of influential labels, including singles on Terrible (2014’s Prism), Birdtapes (2013’s Townie Blunt Guts) and Seagreen (2014’s Leather), as well as a beautiful yet crushing full-length on Exploding in Sound (2013’s Slow Dance In The Cosmos). And in the process he’s become a magnetic live presence while playing out in New York, gaining the notice of discerning listeners and labels alike. February 2016 marks the much-anticipated release of Pool, his debut full-length for Domino and a major step forward for him—as an evolving singer/songwriter, and as a nascent producer. Written and recorded almost entirely in the Manhattan apartment he shares with his partner and frequent collaborator, Greta Kline a.k.a Frankie Cosmos, Pool is an elegantly drawn set of gorgeous, synth-driven pop songs that were influenced, in part, by settling in the city as an artist and a person. “I’m feeling like I’m in a more permanent situation than I’ve been in before,” he says. “There is something special about recording at home. It’s why it sounds the way it does. Being able to obsess over it on your own time and being in your own little cube knowing you’re surrounded by the city, being able to go so deep into it and to spend hours building it, loving it: all of that allowed me to reflect and focus on things a little closer.”  The album was recorded twice - the first time a crash-course in learning Logic and navigating his first synthesizers and drum machines, the second time starting from scratch with a better hold on the recording process - and eventually mixed by Chris Coady (Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Grizzly Bear, Beach House, Tobias Jesso Jr.) in his Los Angeles studio. Sometime in 2014, Maine, a long-devoted Neil Young fan, began listening to house and electronic music and contemporary pop music more closely and frequently than he ever had before. What followed is a hypnotic and expansive re-articulation of the melancholy we’ve come to expect, from the pristine harmonies of “Hour” to the undulating R&B of “Underwater” to the Auto-tuned majesty of the title track. “I feel like the lyrics are like mood boards or collages of my experience in New York,” he says. “Rather than focusing on a particular incident or story like I have in the past, I wanted to be more abstract, in order to paint a very specific mood: ideas of lightness and darkness, water, air, movement, acceptance and security.” The result is a sophisticated and fully immersive listening experience, with Maine’s voice at its center. “I’m getting a little older and a little more in touch with my emotions,” he adds. “I just wanted to make this album more positive and to make sure that my message was coming across clearly this time. I never wanted my music to bum people out.  I feel like I naturally gravitate towards the more melancholic experiences in life, but this time around I tried to dissect those moments and somehow extract what was so beautiful about them to me. With this record, I want people to feel something different, something subtler. I want people to feel dark, beautiful and strong when they hear this new record. I want people to put it on at a party and go wild, to put it on just walking or driving around. I want them to fall in love to this record.”

When Aaron Maine looks back on his early work as Porches, he’s often struck by how sad and angry it can feel. “That music turned out a lot more pessimistic than I intended it to be,” he says. “But when I took a sad moment and turned it into a song, it was a cathartic, positive, and clean process. For me, those moments were victories. Feeling better,” he adds, “was making a song.”

As it turns out, Maine is very good at making songs. Over the last few years, the 27-year-old singer and songwriter has released a wealth of material on a number of influential labels, including singles on Terrible (2014’s Prism), Birdtapes (2013’s Townie Blunt Guts) and Seagreen (2014’s Leather), as well as a beautiful yet crushing full-length on Exploding in Sound (2013’s Slow Dance In The Cosmos). And in the process he’s become a magnetic live presence while playing out in New York, gaining the notice of discerning listeners and labels alike. February 2016 marks the much-anticipated release of Pool, his debut full-length for Domino and a major step forward for him—as an evolving singer/songwriter, and as a nascent producer. Written and recorded almost entirely in the Manhattan apartment he shares with his partner and frequent collaborator, Greta Kline a.k.a Frankie Cosmos, Pool is an elegantly drawn set of gorgeous, synth-driven pop songs that were influenced, in part, by settling in the city as an artist and a person. “I’m feeling like I’m in a more permanent situation than I’ve been in before,” he says. “There is something special about recording at home. It’s why it sounds the way it does. Being able to obsess over it on your own time and being in your own little cube knowing you’re surrounded by the city, being able to go so deep into it and to spend hours building it, loving it: all of that allowed me to reflect and focus on things a little closer.” 

The album was recorded twice - the first time a crash-course in learning Logic and navigating his first synthesizers and drum machines, the second time starting from scratch with a better hold on the recording process - and eventually mixed by Chris Coady (Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Grizzly Bear, Beach House, Tobias Jesso Jr.) in his Los Angeles studio. Sometime in 2014, Maine, a long-devoted Neil Young fan, began listening to house and electronic music and contemporary pop music more closely and frequently than he ever had before. What followed is a hypnotic and expansive re-articulation of the melancholy we’ve come to expect, from the pristine harmonies of “Hour” to the undulating R&B of “Underwater” to the Auto-tuned majesty of the title track. “I feel like the lyrics are like mood boards or collages of my experience in New York,” he says. “Rather than focusing on a particular incident or story like I have in the past, I wanted to be more abstract, in order to paint a very specific mood: ideas of lightness and darkness, water, air, movement, acceptance and security.” The result is a sophisticated and fully immersive listening experience, with Maine’s voice at its center. “I’m getting a little older and a little more in touch with my emotions,” he adds. “I just wanted to make this album more positive and to make sure that my message was coming across clearly this time. I never wanted my music to bum people out.  I feel like I naturally gravitate towards the more melancholic experiences in life, but this time around I tried to dissect those moments and somehow extract what was so beautiful about them to me. With this record, I want people to feel something different, something subtler. I want people to feel dark, beautiful and strong when they hear this new record. I want people to put it on at a party and go wild, to put it on just walking or driving around. I want them to fall in love to this record.”

SULFUR CITY
Oct
27
8:00 pm20:00

SULFUR CITY

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DOORS: 8 PM / $7 ADVANCE  $10 DAY OF / ALL AGES

“Fronted by electric washboard-toting powerhouse Lori Paradis, Ontario band Sulfur City have unleashed a speaker-shredding blues-rock tornado with Talking Loud, which sits beautifully with labelmates the Black Keys but also harbours an intoxicating, multi-hued diversity.” - CLASSIC ROCK MAGAZINE

“On Sulfur City ‘s forthcoming studio album Talking Loud, the band can be found firing on all cylinders with their bluesy psychedelic rock that seems to have been transported straight from the ’60s and ’70s. Between the loose, funky organ, mind-bending guitars and drumming, and of course the ferocious vocal power of the wildly charismatic Lori Paradis, Sulfur City are cranking out music to dance and get weird to.” - GLIDE MAGAZINE

[8.5/10 stars] “Strap yourselves in, brother, cos this is quite a trip…. a superb record” - MAXIMUM VOLUME MUSIC

“… the ideal antidote for anyone clamoring for pure, hi-test rock and roll.” – FYI MUSIC NEWS

“This is a serious rock and roll record, something that’s vanishing faster than bees these days.” - POPMATTERS

“… a sweaty, no-frills amalgam of Canadian soul, stormy, psych-blasted blues rock, and Bayou-blasted boogie rock.” – ALLMUSIC

“The tough frontwoman is not a new rock 'n' roll idea, but Ontario-based Sulfur City's Lori Paradis makes it work on a hardscrabble sophomore long-player that would pay its way at the roughest bars in town.” - MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL

of Montreal, TEEN
Oct
29
8:00 pm20:00

of Montreal, TEEN

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8 PM / $17 ADVANCE / $20 DAY OF / ALL AGES

Hailing from Athens, GA., of Montreal have carved their own niche -- establishing themselves as a band that thrills fans with compelling live performances, delights critics with their constant innovations, and continually showcases their musical evolution by drawing from a different set of influences for each album. Primary songwriter Kevin Barnes pours emotion -- heartbreak, frustration, elation, whimsy -- into lyrics that shift from adopted personas to invented alter egos to unobstructed views directly into his psyche.

Hailing from Athens, GA., of Montreal have carved their own niche -- establishing themselves as a band that thrills fans with compelling live performances, delights critics with their constant innovations, and continually showcases their musical evolution by drawing from a different set of influences for each album.

Primary songwriter Kevin Barnes pours emotion -- heartbreak, frustration, elation, whimsy -- into lyrics that shift from adopted personas to invented alter egos to unobstructed views directly into his psyche.


CONFLICT, TOTAL CHAOS, THE SCANDALS, DEAD TO THE WORLD
Jun
25
8:00 pm20:00

CONFLICT, TOTAL CHAOS, THE SCANDALS, DEAD TO THE WORLD

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Doors: 8 pm / ALL AGES / $15 Advance / $17 Day of Show

Anarchy in the U.K., indeed -- such was the ultimate goal for the fiercely political British punk band Conflict, a group fueled by its hatred of Thatcher's England, the media, the military, and the general status quo of late 20th century life. Conflict played its first gig in 1981 led by vocalist Colin Jerwood, who would remain one of the group's few constants throughout its fluid existence. Much more permanent was the group's political agenda, which was already firmly ensconced by the release of their 1983 debut It's Time to See Who's Who; songs took on topics like Vietnam, nuclear arms, and vegetarianism. The animal liberation movement, which would remain one of Conflict's central concerns throughout their career, returned to the fore on the next year's Increase the Pressure, with its cover art's focus on the Save the Seals fight.

The band's increased political involvement, often in support of unpopular causes, led a number of their concerts to be broken up by the police; a 1987 appearance at the Brixton Academy even ended in widescale rioting (as documented on the live record Turning Rebellion Into Money, named after a Clash lyric). At about the same time, ex-Crass member Steve Ignorant joined Conflict as a joint vocalist. His tenure ended in 1989, the year the band released three different records: The Final Conflict, Against All Odds, and Standard Issue 82-87, a compilation of rare singles and album cuts. After four years of inactivity, Conflict released a single in 1993, followed later in the year by the album Conclusion. The record's title proved premature, however; by 1996, the group was back on tour, in support of a re-recorded, re-titled, and re-issued It's Time to See Who's Who Now. ~ Jason

JOE PURDY, GARRISON STARR
Jun
20
7:00 pm19:00

JOE PURDY, GARRISON STARR

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DOORS: 7 PM / SHOW: 8 PM / $20 / $22 DAY OF BOX OFFICE / ALL AGES

Celebrated singer/songwriter Joe Purdy is more aptly described as a troubadour-the term, as archaic as it may seem, refers moreover to the idea of a communicator of folklore through song-- one who travels and tells stories using the effective medium of music. Purdy understands that his own live music tradition has as much to do with commanding captivated, pin-drop silence as it does prompting roars - which it most definitely has - because in those hushed moments, a solemn and crystal-clear voice, the resonance of acoustic guitar strings into the reverberant din of a music hall, his stories are being heard. It is a pure experience. It's about Joe and his audience.

Celebrated singer/songwriter Joe Purdy is more aptly described as a troubadour-the term, as archaic as it may seem, refers moreover to the idea of a communicator of folklore through song-- one who travels and tells stories using the effective medium of music. Purdy understands that his own live music tradition has as much to do with commanding captivated, pin-drop silence as it does prompting roars - which it most definitely has - because in those hushed moments, a solemn and crystal-clear voice, the resonance of acoustic guitar strings into the reverberant din of a music hall, his stories are being heard. It is a pure experience. It's about Joe and his audience.

Jun
12
8:00 pm20:00

SPEEDY ORTIZ, THE GOOD LIFE, OQUOA

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$12 ADV / $15 DOOR / 8 PM / ALL AGES

Omaha, NE’s The Good Life returns this summer with their first album in eight years, Everybody’s Coming Down. Call it a soundtrack to Man’s 21st century existential angst, the album poses cosmic queries, contemplates regrets, questions self-worth, and examines the possibility of living in the moment, when memories are all that we truly take with us. And in some ways, that’s the sweet spot front man and lyricist Tim Kasher inhabits: trying to make sense of this world of ours, and how and why we navigate it the way we do. 

Everybody’s Coming Down moves in a new direction musically and, in contrast to The Good Life’s earlier releases, is very much a rock record. It is also the first that truly embodies the band as a whole, more so than any previous album. In blending elements of drummer Roger L. Lewis’s love of classic rock, multi-instrumentalist Ryan Fox’s chaotic approach to melody, Stefanie Drootin-Senseney’s propulsive yet tuneful bass parts, and Kasher’s deft, complementary song writing, the band sparked a vibrant evolution in sound. The gentler, folk-driven pop/rock for which the band is beloved remains (sonic sister album bookends “7 In The Morning” and “Midnight Is Upon Us;” “The Troubadour’s Green Room”), but it is now mixed amongst guitars lines that unspool in a blaze across songs that hit harder and more viscerally (“Everybody,” “Holy Shit”), as well as moments of distorted psychedelia and moody ambience (“Flotsam Locked Into A Groove,” “Diving Bell,” “How Small We Are”).

The Good Life have never been afraid to switch up their sound, refusing to be ascribed as one thing or another. 2000’s Novena On A Nocturn – recorded essentially as a solo project by Kasher as an outlet for quieter songs that didn’t quite fit with his long-standing band Cursive – was spacious and stirring, glistening with occasional electronic flourishes. 2002’s Black Out saw The Good Life grow into a full band, telling tales of drunken nights and capricious lovers over an evocative blend of electronic and traditional instrumentation. 2004’s Album Of The Year was the first recorded with the now longtime core band of Kasher, Drootin-Senseney, Fox, and Lewis. Hailed by Pitchfork, Alternative Press, NYLON, SPIN, and Time Out New York, among others, this album left behind any electronic touches as it chronicled 12 months of a doomed relationship – and the attendant complex feelings – through strains of soaring pop. 2007’s Help Wanted Nights, conceived as the soundtrack to a screenplay, was a more musically stripped-down affair and presented a bare look at human emotions through characters in a small-town bar.

Following a tour supporting Help Wanted Nights, and save for a handful of June 2010 shows, the band’s four members quietly moved on to other projects without officially saying goodbye, but with the confident assumption that they’d come back together again. Then life, as it does, took over: Kasher moved around the US, eventually settled in Chicago, and released two Cursive albums as well as two solo albums. Drootin-Senseney relocated to Los Angeles with her husband Chris, where they had a couple of kids and formed the band Big Harp, which released two albums. Fox moved to Portland, OR, worked on solo material, recorded with label-mate Jake Bellows, and started a tape label, Majestic Litter. Lewis stayed put in Omaha – The Good Life gleaned its name from Nebraska’s displaced state slogan – and played with bands Conduits and Oquoa. 

Kasher began writing songs for a new album in October 2013, and the quartet – balancing their busy lives and multiple projects – reconvened from July to December 2014 to finish writing what became Everybody’s Coming Down. With the help of Ben Brodin in Omaha’s ARC Studios, The Good Life started recording in January of this year and finished the album in their respective homes. The band then turned to John Congleton (St. Vincent, Baroness, Angel Olsen, Cloud Nothings) to mix the album at his Elmwood Recording in Dallas, TX, looking to his experienced hand and uninhibited style to maintain and further realize the album’s untempered, vital sound.

And vital it is: Everybody’s Coming Down might not crack the ever-elusive code to our universal wonderings, but it’ll make you think, illuminate a new or alternative perspective, perhaps salve a lonely ache of isolation. Because we are, ultimately, all in this together – forever coming down.

Attention came swiftly following Speedy Ortiz’s 2012 Sports EP on the Boston-centric label Exploding In Sound, and with good reason. Massachusetts-based songwriter/guitarist Sadie Dupuis’ knotty, lyrically dense songs were fully realized by her bandmates, with intricate guitar lines crisscrossing over Darl Ferm’s fluid bass and Mike Falcone’s precisely executed drumming in a way that was simultaneously catchy and jarring. After the success of its 2013 Best New Music-honored debut full-length Major Arcana, the band formalized its assault through a year and a half of relentless touring with bands in whose brainy-slash-brawny legacies it followed—among them Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks, Ex Hex, and The Breeders. In 2014, the band added guitarist Devin McKnight of the Boston-based post-punk group Grass Is Green, whose guitar parts both match and challenge Dupuis’.

Speedy Ortiz’s second proper album—Foil Deer, recorded at Rare Book Room in Brooklyn when the band wasn’t pushing forward on its hectic 2014 tour schedule—comes out on April 21, 2015. The songs represent a leap forward, possessing a lightness that mirrors Dupuis’s post-grad school outlook; they also have a deliberate nature to them, one that emanates from extra studio time and more experimentation with the band’s essential form. (Ferm contributes a few unexpected guitar parts; Falcone’s vocal harmonies zing in with more force.) Speedy Ortiz possesses big-tent rock swagger and punk’s restless yet intimate spirit in a way that makes the impulses seem identical; while the quartet can still command crowds at festivals like Primavera Sound and Pitchfork Music Festival, they also relish playing Boston’s teeming basements alongside the city’s next generation of bands. That willingness to push not just forward, but in all directions, makes Speedy Ortiz one of rock’s most exciting outfits.

oquoa began as the recording project for Max Holmquist (the great american desert) Roger Lewis (neva dinova/conduits) and J.J. Idt (eagle seagull/conduits) in fall 2012. With a full set of songs they entered the studio and started playing shows under the name oquoa. They released the album in the summer of 2014 after Idt left the band. Patrick Newbery (cursive/tim kasher solo) joined on keys that Summer and Mike Overfield (conduits/eagle seagull) on bass and are recording this summer.

oquoa began as the recording project for Max Holmquist (the great american desert) Roger Lewis (neva dinova/conduits) and J.J. Idt (eagle seagull/conduits) in fall 2012. With a full set of songs they entered the studio and started playing shows under the name oquoa. They released the album in the summer of 2014 after Idt left the band. Patrick Newbery (cursive/tim kasher solo) joined on keys that Summer and Mike Overfield (conduits/eagle seagull) on bass and are recording this summer.

Jun
10
8:00 pm20:00

ROGUE WAVE, FLOATING ACTION

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$14 adv / $16 day of
Doors: 8 pm / All Ages

Over the decade and a half that Rogue Wave has made music, Zach Rogue has continued to expand his band's emotional spectrum. Drawing inspiration from the inevitable delusions of everyday American life, Rogue, his longtime bandmate Pat Spurgeon, and their fellow members have returned reinvigorated, and with a fresh sound founded on the art of patience, the fearlessness of experimenting, and the unbridled joy of creating something meaningful to help us navigate through these vacant times. Trusting in its own abilities and leaning on each other, Rogue Wave has seized creative control of its identity and sound and is set to smash any preconceptions of its music, revealing the most truthful, powerful, and urgent sonic blueprint of the band to date. Taking a longer break in between albums than ever before, Rogue enjoyed his extra time off at home in Oakland with his children. The songwriting process for Rogue Wave's music is always the same-"me, alone in a room," as Rogue says-and this time around, he found the most success at home in his bedroom or while driving in his car, even learning to embrace his two-year-old son's "experimental tunings" on his beloved Taylor guitar. Lyrics, however, did not come as easy, and Rogue only found success with his words when slowing himself down and recognizing that his wild juxtapositions of lyrical themes actually felt right. "I wanted the duality," he says, "I wanted the thematic conflict. This is a record of things being out of balance and at odds with one another." Thematically, Rogue Wave's music has never drifted too far from the subject matter of emotional battles with fear and joy in equal parts. Choosing to title the record Delusions of Grand Fur, a riff on the tendency of fresh-faced musicians to misperceive the reality of band life, Rogue found himself reflecting on all that he had learned through his time in Rogue Wave, in addition to our need as humans to keep up appearances. "You think the world will be your oyster and the wounds you were running away from when you joined a band will magically go away-you think you can just become someone else or get whatever you want," he says. "But really, we are all deluded in some way. We need to delude ourselves to deal with the impossibility and difficulty of life. Delusion is what keeps the mythology of America alive. It keeps us from facing our history and our true selves. We don't want to be deluded. We need it." And once he had convinced Spurgeon of the sincere intent behind the titular pun, they began the recording process. In a sense a return to their recording roots, Rogue and Spurgeon decided to work without a producer, instead recording and producing themselves at their home studio in Oakland. Calling to mind the band's debut, 2003's Out of the Shadow, a project completed entirely by Rogue and a single engineer, the band also decided to work without recording demo versions of songs-instead, the demos would simply become the songs. Setting up shop amongst their large collection of well-loved gear at the place they felt most comfortable, the band was free to experiment at will-rarely would they rehearse a song as a band first, instead choosing to tinker and jump off the deep end as Rogue and Spurgeon desired, blessing the process with what seemed like a natural evolution. At times, bassist Mark Masanori Christianson and the band's new guitar player Jon Monohan would come by to throw in some ideas. But by and large the architects remained Rogue and Spurgeon, resulting in a revelatory experience and so many songs the band could have potentially released a double album. The process taught them to trust their instincts while embracing the fleeting energy of an imaginative spark. "It was really nice working at our own pace," says Rogue. "We wanted to just go with our own instincts and trust ourselves. Pat really blossomed as an engineer during this record. His curiosity in the studio is just endless. There are no rules. And that's why I've always been so comfortable bringing song ideas to him, because he is so open." Spurgeon played all the drums on the record, as well as a bit of everything else. In Rogue's words, even Spurgeon's experiments became instruments all of their own, and despite the modest environment and DIY approach, the end result is a clearer snapshot of who Rogue Wave is today. "In a way, it could be argued that we chose the most regressive step by tracking our record in such a comparatively low fidelity environment," says Rogue. "But for the music itself, it is the trajectory I've always wanted for this band. It's the sound of who we actually are, for better or for worse." Echoing that sentiment, Delusions of Grand Fur opens on a confident tone with the upbeat and personal "Take It Slow," a song inspired by a mantra of patience. The energy takes off on the next track, "In the Morning," which was given its gyrating, infectious pulse by the deft hands of its mixer, Chris Walla. And the bright clip of "California Bride," perhaps the tone that will prove most familiar to longtime fans, is a meditation on the beauty and fortune of being alive. "Do you even know how lucky you are?" says Rogue of the song. "You got to live in California and feel the sand in your toes and grab what you wanted from life." But when the dark indie pop of lead single "What Is Left To Solve" opens the second half of the album with electronic flourishes, it's clear that a new, exciting direction is being heralded. Originally written on guitar, the duo was inspired to deconstruct the song by listening to electronic music by Kraftwerk and Grimes. "The synth bass line is meant to represent the futility of thinking you will get a different result when you try to change someone else," says Rogue. "We are slowly but surely replacing human interaction with digital interaction." Continuing the fresh foray, "Frozen Lake" is an interpersonal breakup song that evokes sounds of the '80s, the present, and the future all at once, while the jangly, psychedelic "Ocean" is an instant smash about breaking up, and how getting stabbed in the back can leave you feeling infinitesimally small. When Mike Deni of Geographer lends his soaring voice to the track's bridge, the tune rises to the rafters. By the time the album reaches its close with the slow-burning, achingly lush "Memento Mori," it's clear that Delusions of Grand Fur is a masterstroke by a band that knows who it is and has continued to evolve. Rogue Wave has released a work that serves as a culmination of all it has learned and that trusts itself over all else to deliver that message with a supreme urgency. "Overall, I think we have grown more comfortable in our own skin," say Rogue. "We had total control; we were on our own little island and made the record entirely for our own amusement. As a result, there are some pretty experimental tendencies. It is pretty immersive. There are some very emotional moments. But my relationship with Pat continues to grow. In many ways, I feel like we are just starting to figure out how we like to record music. This record was the most challenging album we've ever worked on, but it never felt like a slog. When we are working on songs together, it just never feels old."

Over the decade and a half that Rogue Wave has made music, Zach Rogue has continued to expand his band's emotional spectrum. Drawing inspiration from the inevitable delusions of everyday American life, Rogue, his longtime bandmate Pat Spurgeon, and their fellow members have returned reinvigorated, and with a fresh sound founded on the art of patience, the fearlessness of experimenting, and the unbridled joy of creating something meaningful to help us navigate through these vacant times. Trusting in its own abilities and leaning on each other, Rogue Wave has seized creative control of its identity and sound and is set to smash any preconceptions of its music, revealing the most truthful, powerful, and urgent sonic blueprint of the band to date.

Taking a longer break in between albums than ever before, Rogue enjoyed his extra time off at home in Oakland with his children. The songwriting process for Rogue Wave's music is always the same-"me, alone in a room," as Rogue says-and this time around, he found the most success at home in his bedroom or while driving in his car, even learning to embrace his two-year-old son's "experimental tunings" on his beloved Taylor guitar. Lyrics, however, did not come as easy, and Rogue only found success with his words when slowing himself down and recognizing that his wild juxtapositions of lyrical themes actually felt right. "I wanted the duality," he says, "I wanted the thematic conflict. This is a record of things being out of balance and at odds with one another." Thematically, Rogue Wave's music has never drifted too far from the subject matter of emotional battles with fear and joy in equal parts.

Choosing to title the record Delusions of Grand Fur, a riff on the tendency of fresh-faced musicians to misperceive the reality of band life, Rogue found himself reflecting on all that he had learned through his time in Rogue Wave, in addition to our need as humans to keep up appearances. "You think the world will be your oyster and the wounds you were running away from when you joined a band will magically go away-you think you can just become someone else or get whatever you want," he says. "But really, we are all deluded in some way. We need to delude ourselves to deal with the impossibility and difficulty of life. Delusion is what keeps the mythology of America alive. It keeps us from facing our history and our true selves. We don't want to be deluded. We need it." And once he had convinced Spurgeon of the sincere intent behind the titular pun, they began the recording process.

In a sense a return to their recording roots, Rogue and Spurgeon decided to work without a producer, instead recording and producing themselves at their home studio in Oakland. Calling to mind the band's debut, 2003's Out of the Shadow, a project completed entirely by Rogue and a single engineer, the band also decided to work without recording demo versions of songs-instead, the demos would simply become the songs. Setting up shop amongst their large collection of well-loved gear at the place they felt most comfortable, the band was free to experiment at will-rarely would they rehearse a song as a band first, instead choosing to tinker and jump off the deep end as Rogue and Spurgeon desired, blessing the process with what seemed like a natural evolution. At times, bassist Mark Masanori Christianson and the band's new guitar player Jon Monohan would come by to throw in some ideas. But by and large the architects remained Rogue and Spurgeon, resulting in a revelatory experience and so many songs the band could have potentially released a double album. The process taught them to trust their instincts while embracing the fleeting energy of an imaginative spark.

"It was really nice working at our own pace," says Rogue. "We wanted to just go with our own instincts and trust ourselves. Pat really blossomed as an engineer during this record. His curiosity in the studio is just endless. There are no rules. And that's why I've always been so comfortable bringing song ideas to him, because he is so open." Spurgeon played all the drums on the record, as well as a bit of everything else. In Rogue's words, even Spurgeon's experiments became instruments all of their own, and despite the modest environment and DIY approach, the end result is a clearer snapshot of who Rogue Wave is today.

"In a way, it could be argued that we chose the most regressive step by tracking our record in such a comparatively low fidelity environment," says Rogue. "But for the music itself, it is the trajectory I've always wanted for this band. It's the sound of who we actually are, for better or for worse."

Echoing that sentiment, Delusions of Grand Fur opens on a confident tone with the upbeat and personal "Take It Slow," a song inspired by a mantra of patience. The energy takes off on the next track, "In the Morning," which was given its gyrating, infectious pulse by the deft hands of its mixer, Chris Walla. And the bright clip of "California Bride," perhaps the tone that will prove most familiar to longtime fans, is a meditation on the beauty and fortune of being alive. "Do you even know how lucky you are?" says Rogue of the song. "You got to live in California and feel the sand in your toes and grab what you wanted from life."

But when the dark indie pop of lead single "What Is Left To Solve" opens the second half of the album with electronic flourishes, it's clear that a new, exciting direction is being heralded. Originally written on guitar, the duo was inspired to deconstruct the song by listening to electronic music by Kraftwerk and Grimes. "The synth bass line is meant to represent the futility of thinking you will get a different result when you try to change someone else," says Rogue. "We are slowly but surely replacing human interaction with digital interaction."

Continuing the fresh foray, "Frozen Lake" is an interpersonal breakup song that evokes sounds of the '80s, the present, and the future all at once, while the jangly, psychedelic "Ocean" is an instant smash about breaking up, and how getting stabbed in the back can leave you feeling infinitesimally small. When Mike Deni of Geographer lends his soaring voice to the track's bridge, the tune rises to the rafters. By the time the album reaches its close with the slow-burning, achingly lush "Memento Mori," it's clear that Delusions of Grand Fur is a masterstroke by a band that knows who it is and has continued to evolve. Rogue Wave has released a work that serves as a culmination of all it has learned and that trusts itself over all else to deliver that message with a supreme urgency.

"Overall, I think we have grown more comfortable in our own skin," say Rogue. "We had total control; we were on our own little island and made the record entirely for our own amusement. As a result, there are some pretty experimental tendencies. It is pretty immersive. There are some very emotional moments. But my relationship with Pat continues to grow. In many ways, I feel like we are just starting to figure out how we like to record music. This record was the most challenging album we've ever worked on, but it never felt like a slog. When we are working on songs together, it just never feels old."

Jun
8
7:00 pm19:00

THE HOTELIER, TOLD SLANT, LOONE, FOOTBALL ETC

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DOORS: 7 PM / $12 ADVANCE / $15 DAY OF SHOW

RSVP!

It is not enough to say that The Hotelier have grown older, or wiser, or more of anything. We can trace a progression, if we like, from the explosive empowerment of It Never Goes Out to the ashen disillusionment of Home, Like Noplace Is There. We can follow an awakening of youth in suburbia attempting to learn what is right, and what is ours, and what is possible and impossible, and maybe we can't save each other like we thought we once could. We're awake and we're tired and we want love in our lives again. And so we find ourselves now in Goodness, in the woods outside of the suburbs, trying to re-learn that love. But we seek a space outside time. Once in a while we can feel it, like a clearing. Where our histories and our rhetoric blends into languages spoken and unspoken. Where the greatest awe comes upon us for the overlooked, the simple, the incomprehensible. Where things glitch as they solidify, repeat as they evolve, scream as they whisper. Where always and forever above us, in all of its natural, unnatural, supernatural love, shines the moon. Goodness is not this place --goodness is nowhere -- but we are following it to where we have to be. After all we've gone through, how young are we? What is age softening in us, what is it hardening in us? Are we getting better? Worse? How could we ever know, when capital forces us onward away from ourselves? Will the woods consume the suburbs; will the suburbs consume the woods? In the gaps between these monumental questions, in the tiniest details, in the infinitude of cycles outside of time, there is Goodness. We begin there.

It is not enough to say that The Hotelier have grown older, or wiser, or more of anything. We can trace a progression, if we like, from the explosive empowerment of It Never Goes Out to the ashen disillusionment of Home, Like Noplace Is There. We can follow an awakening of youth in suburbia attempting to learn what is right, and what is ours, and what is possible and impossible, and maybe we can't save each other like we thought we once could. We're awake and we're tired and we want love in our lives again. And so we find ourselves now in Goodness, in the woods outside of the suburbs, trying to re-learn that love. But we seek a space outside time. Once in a while we can feel it, like a clearing. Where our histories and our rhetoric blends into languages spoken and unspoken. Where the greatest awe comes upon us for the overlooked, the simple, the incomprehensible. Where things glitch as they solidify, repeat as they evolve, scream as they whisper. Where always and forever above us, in all of its natural, unnatural, supernatural love, shines the moon. Goodness is not this place --goodness is nowhere -- but we are following it to where we have to be. After all we've gone through, how young are we? What is age softening in us, what is it hardening in us? Are we getting better? Worse? How could we ever know, when capital forces us onward away from ourselves? Will the woods consume the suburbs; will the suburbs consume the woods? In the gaps between these monumental questions, in the tiniest details, in the infinitude of cycles outside of time, there is Goodness. We begin there.

Jun
4
7:00 pm19:00

THE GRIZZY BAND, BEFORE RADIO, SIK MULE, SATIN HOOKS

The Grizzly Band - (Altercation Records)
This band has reached amazing stride's since they're 2012 inception, and the momentum behind them keeps growing and growing!! 
Revealing they’re inspirations from the talents of Bruce Springsteen, Lucero, Social Distortion, Johnny Cash, and Jawbreaker, this band comes out with a More than mesmerizing performance. The mixture of punk, rock n roll, and country (esq) overtones is almost mind boggling. The kind of band that leaves you in absolute awe! True southern whisky punk! 
The band has recently shared the stage with such contemporaries as Zeke, Old Man Markley, Riverboat Gamblers, 2 Rocklahoma Fests, and oh, so much more. . . 
https://www.facebook.com/TheGrizzlyBand


Before Radio - 
Sighted as one of Houston’s more energetic bands, Before Radio hit a quick stride by Immediately striking crowds with easy to swallow songs, and a perplexingly poppy, "bob your head" type command. The energy in the music can build to almost pure chaos, and yet maintain an absolute detail of design. Akin to early Goo Goo Dolls, Descendents, and even traces of Gin Blossoms. Quoter’s from they’re last show here in December, insisted they where “better than radio”. 
https://www.facebook.com/beforeradioband/

Sik Mule - 

These guys truly are Sik!!
"Stomp-Rock Groove Blasters!" It's raw, electric, Punk-Drunken Bluesy Rock. They got that soulful sound & wild performance...You're in for a treat!
https://www.facebook.com/sikmule/

Satin Hooks - 
This band hit hard in the mid to late 2000”s exhilarating any place they played! 
Whether it be an off the beaten path warehouse, or the West Fest street festivals, This band has a legendary status of there own, bringing down the house In a fashion only they could, and its just as surreal as the hooks actually are! Centered in the experimental, but somehow making since, the pleasantry's , the pace, originality and design is something that has never been touched. And Good luck trying, cause they are back, and keeping they're throne!!

Jun
2
7:30 pm19:30

HOLY GRAIL, SAVAGE MASTER, HEL-RAZOR, THUNDERTANK

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RSVP

Doors at 7:30 pm / $12 advance / $15 Door / All Ages

Like many of the legendary bands whose influences they wear on their tattered sleeves, the Los Angeles quintet HOLY GRAIL made an immediate impact when they exploded onto the metal scene in 2009. Here were five immortal men who fought to kill, armed with an infectious sound – a mix of classic heavy metal and modern sensibilities – sure to win over even the most jaded of cynics. As if on cue, metal media around the world swooned immediately. Metal Hammer UK nominated HOLY GRAIL for their “best new band” Golden Gods Award based solely on the two original tracks that appeared on their debut EP “Improper Burial”, while the group was invited to perform at major worldwide events such as the Wacken:Open:Air (Germany) and Download Festival (UK) before their full-length debut was even finished being recorded. When their full-length debut “Crisis In Utopia” was finally released in late 2010, it was clear from the opening notes on that HOLY GRAIL’s music is their silver bullet. The album reasserted the group’s potential and earned the band a new round of critical acclaim, with Revolver Magazine naming the release one of 2010′s Top 20 albums. Hereafter, the group hit the road for a nearly two-year touring cycle during which guitarist Alex Lee (ex-BONDED BY BLOOD) joined the fold and the band performed alongside the likes of BLIND GUARDIAN, ELUVEITIE and DRAGONFORCE, among others. In addition, they further developed a burgeoning international fan base by touring Japan, Australia and the UK. If “Crisis In Utopia” hinted at what HOLY GRAIL could achieve, new album “Ride The Void” shouts it through a megaphone. Gone are sword-and-steel odes to Valhalla; in their place are morbid tales of serial killers. Indeed, producer Matt Hyde (SLAYER, CHILDREN OF BODOM) brought out a darker, hungrier side of the band than many have heard to date – yet musically, they’re more exhilarating than ever: Witness the galloping riff of “Dark Passenger”, the betcha-can’t-play-this exuberance of the opening lick of “Too Decayed To Wait” or the unexpected triumphant and melodic solo in “The Great Artifice”. Perhaps more importantly, the album sees HOLY GRAIL continue to expand the limits of their sound by incorporating classical guitar (“Wake Me When It’s Over”), a cinematic, QUEEN-like vocal intro (the otherwise anthemic “Sleep of Virtue”), a trance-like guitar loop (“Silence The Scream”) that cleverly belies the lyrical content it introduces, and a moody finale (“Rains of Sorrow”) inspired by a family member’s battle with cancer. Someone pretty might catch your attention, but only someone special can keep it. HOLY GRAIL could have easily written an album filled with lovable tales of mead-chugging knights-on-horseback, but instead, they pushed themselves further – and in the end, created an unforgettable collection of timeless metal anthems that not only validates the early praise they received, but creates an exciting question: Where will they go from here? For now, though, buckle up and enjoy the ride!

Like many of the legendary bands whose influences they wear on their tattered sleeves, the Los Angeles quintet HOLY GRAIL made an immediate impact when they exploded onto the metal scene in 2009. Here were five immortal men who fought to kill, armed with an infectious sound – a mix of classic heavy metal and modern sensibilities – sure to win over even the most jaded of cynics. As if on cue, metal media around the world swooned immediately. Metal Hammer UK nominated HOLY GRAIL for their “best new band” Golden Gods Award based solely on the two original tracks that appeared on their debut EP “Improper Burial”, while the group was invited to perform at major worldwide events such as the Wacken:Open:Air (Germany) and Download Festival (UK) before their full-length debut was even finished being recorded. When their full-length debut “Crisis In Utopia” was finally released in late 2010, it was clear from the opening notes on that HOLY GRAIL’s music is their silver bullet. The album reasserted the group’s potential and earned the band a new round of critical acclaim, with Revolver Magazine naming the release one of 2010′s Top 20 albums. Hereafter, the group hit the road for a nearly two-year touring cycle during which guitarist Alex Lee (ex-BONDED BY BLOOD) joined the fold and the band performed alongside the likes of BLIND GUARDIAN, ELUVEITIE and DRAGONFORCE, among others. In addition, they further developed a burgeoning international fan base by touring Japan, Australia and the UK.

If “Crisis In Utopia” hinted at what HOLY GRAIL could achieve, new album “Ride The Void” shouts it through a megaphone. Gone are sword-and-steel odes to Valhalla; in their place are morbid tales of serial killers. Indeed, producer Matt Hyde (SLAYER, CHILDREN OF BODOM) brought out a darker, hungrier side of the band than many have heard to date – yet musically, they’re more exhilarating than ever: Witness the galloping riff of “Dark Passenger”, the betcha-can’t-play-this exuberance of the opening lick of “Too Decayed To Wait” or the unexpected triumphant and melodic solo in “The Great Artifice”. Perhaps more importantly, the album sees HOLY GRAIL continue to expand the limits of their sound by incorporating classical guitar (“Wake Me When It’s Over”), a cinematic, QUEEN-like vocal intro (the otherwise anthemic “Sleep of Virtue”), a trance-like guitar loop (“Silence The Scream”) that cleverly belies the lyrical content it introduces, and a moody finale (“Rains of Sorrow”) inspired by a family member’s battle with cancer.
Someone pretty might catch your attention, but only someone special can keep it. HOLY GRAIL could have easily written an album filled with lovable tales of mead-chugging knights-on-horseback, but instead, they pushed themselves further – and in the end, created an unforgettable collection of timeless metal anthems that not only validates the early praise they received, but creates an exciting question: Where will they go from here? For now, though, buckle up and enjoy the ride!

SAVAGE MASTER features female vocals soaring on Lucifer's wings, over sick rockin' guitar riffs straight from the depths of hell, to honor and pass along the great traditions of our True Occult Heavy Metal foremothers and forefathers.

SAVAGE MASTER features female vocals soaring on Lucifer's wings, over sick rockin' guitar riffs straight from the depths of hell, to honor and pass along the great traditions of our True Occult Heavy Metal foremothers and forefathers.

May
25
8:00 pm20:00

CHRIS COHEN (Captured Tracks), GUESS GENES, ROSE ETTE

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8 PM / $7 ADV / $10 DOOR / ALL AGES

As If Apart, the long-awaited sequel to Chris Cohen’s 2012 soft psych garden of unearthly alter-pop earworms and studio-sonic delights Overgrown Path, follows on its predecessor with another bittersweet ensemble of dreamy, complex songs. Pushing the idiosyncrasies of Cohen’s melodic and rhythmic approach into even more fractured, shifting spaces, As If Apart unsettles lazy pop conventions, upending jaded heads and hearts with an expansive, moody psychedelia. Where Overgrown Path plunged within, As If Apart voyages out. And up.  - Sometimes as a leader, sometimes as a sideman and collaborator; sometimes as an invisible musician but you’ve heard him: the chest-high bass drum thump, the tightly paired flight of guitars in odd harmony, the disorienting shift in time and texture that resolves itself into song. Chris Cohen has plied the inside and outside folds of pop musical possibility since at least 1978, when he first set infant drumstick to skin at the tender age of three, initiating decades of sonic experimentation across multiple bands and nearly a dozen recordings. - Cohen’s songwriting isn’t so much disjunctive as subjunctive, asking “what if,” playing against the expected and building suspense, breaking like waves or the patterns at the edges of things. Chris makes music with the patience of a gardener: he went out and collected a backyard’s worth of thorny succulents, took them home and cultivated them like so. They are modular plants – cut one little piece, stick it in the ground, give it time. Come back and find it branching, breaking and replanting itself into tangle and form. You notice yourself changed too. - To say that this is how pop music should have turned out would be nostalgic — a misapprehension of time, pop, history and our place within those structures — what we could say is that this is how pop music has turned out alongside itself –how it has become beside itself – as if apart.

As If Apart, the long-awaited sequel to Chris Cohen’s 2012 soft psych garden of unearthly alter-pop earworms and studio-sonic delights Overgrown Path, follows on its predecessor with another bittersweet ensemble of dreamy, complex songs. Pushing the idiosyncrasies of Cohen’s melodic and rhythmic approach into even more fractured, shifting spaces, As If Apart unsettles lazy pop conventions, upending jaded heads and hearts with an expansive, moody psychedelia. Where Overgrown Path plunged within, As If Apart voyages out. And up.
 -
Sometimes as a leader, sometimes as a sideman and collaborator; sometimes as an invisible musician but you’ve heard him: the chest-high bass drum thump, the tightly paired flight of guitars in odd harmony, the disorienting shift in time and texture that resolves itself into song. Chris Cohen has plied the inside and outside folds of pop musical possibility since at least 1978, when he first set infant drumstick to skin at the tender age of three, initiating decades of sonic experimentation across multiple bands and nearly a dozen recordings.
-
Cohen’s songwriting isn’t so much disjunctive as subjunctive, asking “what if,” playing against the expected and building suspense, breaking like waves or the patterns at the edges of things. Chris makes music with the patience of a gardener: he went out and collected a backyard’s worth of thorny succulents, took them home and cultivated them like so. They are modular plants – cut one little piece, stick it in the ground, give it time. Come back and find it branching, breaking and replanting itself into tangle and form. You notice yourself changed too.
-
To say that this is how pop music should have turned out would be nostalgic — a misapprehension of time, pop, history and our place within those structures — what we could say is that this is how pop music has turned out alongside itself –how it has become beside itself – as if apart.

May
19
8:00 pm20:00

JMSN

BUY TICKETS

Doors: 8 / $12 Advance / $15 Day of / $17 Box office / ALL AGES

Born in Detroit, and currently residing in Los Angeles, JMSN (born Christian Berishaj), is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, engineer, mixer, and videographer. The R&B crooner, who released his debut album, †Priscilla†, in January 2012, also operates his indie label, White Room Records, out of his home studio. The success of his freshman album captured the attention of platinum-selling artist Usher, and even landed JMSN four slots on Kendrick Lamar's groundbreaking Good Kid, M.A.A.D City album ("Bitch Don't Kill My Vibe", "The Art Of Peer Pressure", "Sing About Me/Dying Of Thirst", "Real").

JMSN's impressive talents have allowed him to collaborate with the likes of Game, J. Cole, Tyga, Ab-Soul, Kaytranada, Ta-ku, and many others. The success of JMSN's self-titled album, affectionately known as the Blue Album, released in December 2014, paved the way for a successful world tour, including multiple stops across North America, Europe, Australia, and China. JMSN's musical evolution continues with a new release coming in 2016 via White Room Records.