Walter's Downtown

1120 Naylor Houston,TX 77002

8:00 pm20:00


Ticket Prices:
$12.00 ADV
$15.00 Day Of
$17.00 Box Office

This show is All Ages

This show has been rescheduled to December 3rd at Walter's Downtown. Tickets purchased for the original date will be valid for the new date.

The Octopus Project has been releasing joyous electronic-rock-noise-party music since 2002, all the while touring the world playing festivals such as Coachella, Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits, and All Tomorrow's Parties, and as handpicked support for artists as diverse as Aesop Rock, DEVO, and Explosions in the Sky. Through their musical and visual work they've earned a reputation for elaborate multimedia experiments and extremely fun, extremely loud live shows. The band has released fivefull-length albums --2013's Fever Formsbeing the latest. Also active as composers for video games and film, they were awarded the Special Jury Award for Musical Score at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival for their work on the film Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter. Projects since then have included the immersive installation/performance Shapes (and Other Shapes)and the release of Mister, a limited, handmade plush toy which included exclusive new tracks.They are currently working on new music and will be touring Europe in September 2015

6:30 pm18:30


$10 presale:

$13 at door

$32 for complete Two-Day Pass (SAVE $$$$) *pre-sale only*

DOORS AT 6:30!!

(Atlanta Hardcore, Bridge 9 Records, final TX show before breaking up!)

(Houston champs, Harm Reduction Records)

(Dallas/Fort Worth, Harm Reduction Records)

(Houston hardcore)

(Houston Straight Edge)

(Houston hardcore)


6:30 pm18:30

FALLCORE DAY 2 feat. D.R.I., ALL OUT WAR, BITTER END plus much more

$22 pre-sale:
$25 at door
$32 complete Two-Day Pass *pre-sale only*
Doors at 2:00pm

They may have moved to the west coast, but these thrash legends started in Houston, TX!

Upstate NY metallic hardcore legends return to TX in support of their crushing new EP "Dying Gods"

Texas favorites return in support of their new LP "Illusions of Dominance" on Deathwish Inc.

Houston hardcore, old habits die hard

Houston metal to blaze it up to

Dallas/Forth Worth hardcore on Bridge 9 Records

No longer just Concrete, they are Concrete ELITE. Got it? Austin TX's favorite Oi band

Do you like Machine Head? Hardside does. From San Antonio, on BDHW Records

Houston Thrash-masters, formerly known as Legion

Dallas/Fort Worth hardcore

San Antonio hardcore

San Antonio hardcore, with veins popping out

Southside Houston nice guys who look like scumbags

Houston hardcore

7:00 pm19:00



Doors at 7:00 pm / $15 / ALL AGES

Wild Child doesn’t want a place to hide. Song after song, town after town, they’ll wear their hearts on their sleeves, addicted to the rush that only comes when thousands of strangers know all your secrets and sing them back to you, because they’re their secrets, too.

“It’s not necessarily the performing that’s addictive, but being able to connect with that many people at once,” says Kelsey Wilson, who shares lead vocal and songwriting responsibilities for the Austin-based seven-piece band with Alexander Beggins. “You feel like you’re together in something––like you experience the whole thing together. It’s family therapy with a lot of dancing.”

Wild Child’s third album Fools (out via Dualtone Records) is an ambitious collection of lush pop that takes sad stories and transforms them into an ebullient love letter to the power of music and the art of living with yourself.

Made up of Kelsey on violin and vocals, Alexander on ukulele and vocals, Evan Magers on keyboards, Sadie Wolfe on cello, Chris D’Annunzio on bass, Drew Brunetti on drums, and Matt Bradshaw on trumpet, Wild Child has built a sprawling grassroots following on the strength of high-spirited live shows that feel like self-contained joy benders, along with two precocious albums.

2011’s Pillow Talk notched four no. 1 singles on indie pulse monitor Hype Machine, spurred on by music bloggers who fell early and hard for the quirky group. 2013’s The Runaround upped the ante, making best-of lists and garnering glowing reviews and write-ups from NPR, Paste, Pop Matters, and many others. Then Wild Child hit TV, performing on the Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson and serving as the featured artists on CBS Saturday Morning. Since forming five years ago after Kelsey and Alexander met during a stint as members of a backup band for a Danish artist’s U.S. tour, Wild Child has gone from playing shows for nine people to selling out venues across North America and Europe.

Not bad for an indie outfit who, up until now, has been thriving without radio spins or record label muscle. And it all started when two Texas kids too scared to sing for crowds discovered they wrote hauntingly good songs together.

Wild Child recorded Fools at Doll House Studios in Savannah, Georgia. Produced by Peter Mavrogeorgis and David Plakon with additional tracks helmed by red-letter guest producers Max Frost (“Break Bones”) and Chris “Frenchie” Smith (“Trillo Talk”), Fools reveals that while Austin’s favorite gang of lost boys and girls have grown up to become fiercely skilled musicians who have charmed the world, their faces remain grinning and often painted, spirits stubborn and free, barbs sharp and cathartic.

While writing for the album, Kelsey split from her fiancé of five years “It was the first time that I’d ever had writer’s block,” she remembers. “Within a week, all of the lyrics just came out.”

“She used this album as a platform to say a lot of things she wanted to say,” Alexander says. “It’s a story that’s not exactly linear, but you hear someone going through something.”

Kelsey and Alexander co-wrote all of the record’s songs, while the title track was penned by the entire band––a first for the group. A complexly layered, funky gem, “Fools” saunters as Kelsey and Alexander sigh, “If you have to go / I’ll play the fool,” a sly acknowledgement that no matter what else is going on in the relationship, it’d be easier to hold on than to let it fall apart.

The act of consciously playing the fool shows up repeatedly throughout the record, and Wild Child flaunts a postmodern comfort with perspective’s slippery grip on truth. “The Cracks” pulses with uncertainty as Kelsey delicately cries, “You went too far, went way too far / We went too far, went way too far,” while in “Bullets,” she croons, “I know you think I took a lot from you.” “Meadows” asks a lover how much they’re willing to sacrifice, while “Take It” and “Reno” tackle separation and trust.

The sole purely exuberant note on the album, “Bad Girl” is a Motown-inspired celebration of the birth of Kelsey’s first niece. “Oklahoma,” a harmony-soaked strings showcase that kicks off with an electro-pop tease, was slated for The Runaround but didn’t quite fit until Fools. Originally intended for Pillow Talk, “Stones” was mined from lyrics Kelsey penned when she was 15 years old. Now, it’s part bubbly piano-man ramble, part sweeping string-led drama, capped off by a brassy New Orleans breakdown––a perfect example of the band’s increasingly virtuosic ability to stretch and crisply fold genres into their ever-expanding repertoire.

“Break Bones” is a stunner––a big, bold, beautiful pop song praying a fight continues indefinitely, because that’s all that’s left. “Trillo Talk,” a last minute addition to the record and an ideal closer, winks to fan favorites “Pillow Talk” and “RilloTalk” and soars triumphantly. “It’s the last thought––everything is going to be okay…but it’s not. But, it feels alright,” Alexander says.

Vocally, Alexander strolls, steady and wry, as Kelsey skips, runs, and hops, all whirly energy and instinctive phrasing. “I think my voice just sits nice underneath hers,” Alexander says, simply and accurately. “The two of us never really intended to be singers and still don’t really consider ourselves singers,” says Kelsey, without a hint of irony. NPR’s Ann Powers likened her voice to that of a “Jazz Age Broadway baby,” but bring up that and other praise, and Kelsey just laughs and emphasizes, “I don’t think of myself as a singer. I think of it just like talking. We’re just having a conversation.”

In their musical repartee, Wild Child doesn’t pull punches. Their songs sting as they groove, cutting lyrics massaged by cooing vocals and bouncy ukulele. So we’re dancing and laughing before we realize we’ve got tears in our eyes, entranced by Wild Child’s dizzying contradiction: sour truths that sound so sweet.

“The instruments may belong in a granola commercial, but what we’re saying is often dark and angry and bitter,” says Kelsey. “It wasn’t until Alexander and I started writing music together that we were like, ‘Damn. Are we sad?’”

“There is a beauty in lyric writing that is almost too honest,” Alexander says. “We’ve always tried to poke holes in that terrible thing that nobody really wants to think about.”

Fools is an unashamed breakup album, but it’s more than last rites for lovers. The record also bids farewell to the traditional lives Kelsey and Alexander had thought lie in store.

“We’re about to live day to day for a long time, and our relationships are going to fall apart,” Kelsey says. “Our home lives are going to fall apart. And there’s nothing we can do about it. So, the record is also about letting go of expectations, just playing the fool. Fools is a release––a blind step out.”

8:00 pm20:00



Doors at 8:00 pm
$7 Advance / $10 Door / ALL AGES

Linear Downfall, an experimental band from Nashville, is known for seamlessly blending psychotic noise along with beautiful melodies. Their music taps into the highs and lows of life and challenges one to look inward. Their live show is intense and jarring captivating the audience from beginning to end. They have self-released three albums, extensively toured the U.S., and caught the attention of the Flaming Lips which led to their side project called the Electric Würms. 

In 2014, they toured in support of their third self-released album, "Fragmental Hippocampus" and released the first Electric Würms album, "Musik, die Schwer zu Twerk." A 5-song online release of brand new material was released in November as the band put the finishing touches on a 4th album, "Sufferland." The band plans to release "Sufferland" in 2015 along with a full-length film to correspond with the highly visual music of their new album.

8:00 pm20:00



Doors @ 8:00 pm / $7 Advance / $10 Door

Embarking upon a sophomore effort can be a daunting task for any young upstart, and there's no denying Avi Buffalo's own bar was set quite high with 2010's celebrated eponymous debut. Fear not, dear fans/family/friends/friends of friends/newcomers, there's nothing in this tale about The Second Album—a.k.a. At Best Cuckold, due September 8th in Europe and September 9th in North America on Sub Pop—that even remotely resembles a slump; in fact, it would be entirely appropriate to say that this Long Beach, California, enterprise is getting better with age.

Ah, yes, age—much was made of it when Avi Buffalo's first album hit the ground running, and for good reason: While their Millikan High School classmates were preoccupied with quaint and youthful pursuits, the musicians behind Avi Buffalo were busy making an off-kilter pop gem that eventually bowled over NME, The AV Club, Pitchfork, the BBC, and numerous other outlets on both sides of the Atlantic whose tastes are respected by the general public. Like a lot of kids their age, the Buffaloes celebrated the end of high school in Europe, but instead of visiting the Louvre and Buckingham Palace, their overseas journeys took them to the festival stages of Reading, Leeds, Glastonbury, the Pavement-curated All Tomorrow's Parties in Minehead, and beyond. 

So is Avi Buffalo a he or a them? The answer is a definitive yes, as leader Avigdor Zahner-Isenberg has lent his musical nickname—bestowed in childhood by a pal who'd picked up on his friend's inclination toward spicy chicken wings—to this full-fledged outfit that works something like a solo project in the studio and then builds into a band onstage. Not that he goes it alone when recording—to the contrary, many able-bodied compatriots, including longtime collaborator Sheridan Riley, have assisted with committing his songs to tape—but everything begins and ends with Avi, and after ending a year on the road in support of the first record, he decided to take his time beginning work on the second.

The creation of At Best Cuckold turned out to be a three-year journey; a stretch of time that resembles its predecessor. While transitioning from teenager to twentysomething and traversing the interpersonal wilds which accompany that age, Avi kept playing music (even picking up a new instrument every now and again), collaborated with and produced several friends (including Kevin Litrow's N.O.W. project and Douglas James Sweeney's Arjuna Genome), and even started DJing. He also wrote new songs, and by the time 2013 rolled around, it was time to begin capturing his latest sparks—with that, the band headed into the studio on New Year's Day.

Two weeks later, the basic tracks for At Best Cuckold were recorded, having been captured at Tiny Telephone, the analog-friendly San Francisco studio run by John Vanderslice of John Vanderslice fame. The engineering was actually handled by Jay Pellicci (The Dodos, Deerhoof, Sleater-Kinney), though during his stay, Avi had a chance to play with the head honcho when he was asked to contribute to JV's tribute to Bowie's Diamond Dogs. Needless to say, Avi has nice things to say about the place.

The "clean and tight" recordings from Tiny Telephone served as perfect skeletons for Avi to flesh out with his analog and digital overdubs, which were completed over the next year or so at various locations around Southern California. ("I've always had a lot of fun with overdubs," says Avi. "Maybe my favorite instrument is overdubs.") The result—which was completed and mixed with Nicolas Vernhes at his Rare Book Room studio in Brooklyn—is a quirky yet comforting set of songs driven by refined pop songcraft and sneaky moments of grandeur that stick in the brain. Classic-sounding melodies are delivered with a modern sensibility, creating an album that's equal parts timely and timeless. Well-placed piano, sax, clarinet, French horn, and cornet further enhance the proceedings with a glorious orch-pop sheen.

"So What" gets things started with its understated charm and sing-songy goodness, however, it isn't until the rollicking "Memories of You" that Avi lets his trademark falsetto fly. There are great pop moments all over At Best Cuckold, but Avi also excels at moodiness, exemplified in subdued beauties like "Two Cherished Understandings" and "Oxygen Tank."

"I really like some of the ballad aspects of this record—it's kind of my tribute to the ballad," says Avi. "I predicted in an interview during the time of my first record what I was going to use in my next record, and I said a lot of major seventh chords, which, to me, sounded like laying down. And that ended up in the record, too."

Lyrically, there are a lot of unsettled emotions on the album; a product of Avi observing the world around him and writing "about life, dealing with relationships and yourself, and trying to keep your head up and keep learning amidst whatever it is you're going through." Disappointment ("Thought we understood each other well / I was wrong as usual") and anxiety ("Someone told me if I messed around / then my head would fill up with guilty clouds") abound, though there's also a feeling that everything is eventually going to turn out okay, even when everything seems to be falling apart during closer "Won't Be Around No More." If anything, Avi's passionate delivery is the ultimate source of optimism.  

At the ripe old age of 23, Avi Buffalo is ready to take on the world (again), armed with all of the experience he's compiled over the past few years. And he's made sure the second time around will be just as memorable as the first.

8:00 pm20:00



Tickets: $15 / Doors: 8:00pm / Show: 9:00pm

Tanlines - singer/guitarist Eric Emm and multi-instrumentalist Jesse Cohen - will release their sophomore album, Highlights, on May 19th, 2015. Produced by the band and Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor, Highlights began in a basement in Pittsburgh and ended in a church in Brooklyn. It trades world music sounds (as heard through YouTube) for a more alive, realized approach, the result of Emm and Cohen wanting to break from their ‘two guys, one screen’ writing style. The transition came suddenly: when they sat down to write Highlights in Emm’s childhood home in Pittsburgh, their computer blew up, quite literally, “with a burst of sparks and clouds of smoke. Whatever had just happened felt like some kind of omen,” says Emm.

Stranded without the samples and sounds that had previously defined their musical palette, they spent the rest of the week in Pittsburgh writing songs the old-fashioned way—with a guitar and drums. They found themselves falling back on facility they’d gained with their instruments over the previous two years of touring, and an alternative, simpler process evolved, one that set the tone for Highlights immediately.

Influenced by their time spent on the road touring Mixed Emotions, primarily in the States, they reached for the sounds of 90’s New York hip-hop drums, Detroit techno synths, and lots and lots of guitars. The results of which would lead them to call this their ‘American album’, “though it may only sound that way to us,” says Emm. Instead, let’s just call Highlights “the album where things started making more sense.” Whereas before the band had wandered their way through foreign musical landscapes and the existential ‘what am I doing with my life’ wasteland of post-youth, Highlights finds the band settled and at home, comfortable in their own skin.

Indeed, one listen to Highlights shows this change in subject matter has brought Tanlines to a more evolved, sophisticated place. Themes of love and desire replace questions of the unknown. Partnerships are celebrated while relationships grow and change and give way to safe-distance reflections on the past without the trappings of nostalgia.

Between working in Los Angeles with producer Patrick Ford, and their hometown of New York City with Chris Taylor, they eventually settled on the ten songs that make up the album. Taylor brought them to record in a 100 year-old church; the unfamiliar settings and Taylor’s energy and enthusiasm pushed the band to new heights. Most noticeable are Emm’s powerful vocals, broadcast from the balcony of the empty church, and thankfully, captured warmly and beautifully by Taylor across the whole album.

In many ways, the resulting music feels like a renaissance for a band that began in 2008 as a one-off remix project. The upbeat dancefloor-ready Tanlines lives on in songs like driving set opener “Pieces”, the dream-inspired “Slipping Away”, and the seductive “Bad Situations”, but the colors and emotional range of the album go much deeper than ever before, with Emm’s vocals and lyrics, at once personal and observational, taking center stage on songs like “Running Still” and “Invisible Ways.”

8:00 pm20:00



DOORS: 8 / $8 ADV / $12 DOOR / ALL AGES

The word "bully" has a negative connotation in 2015, one heavy with menace and violence. A bully is an instigator, an aggressorsomeone who can spot your weaknesses and exploit them mercilessly. It's a curious name for a Nashville quartet that is transforming familiar '90s alt-rock (Dinosaur Jr, Pavement, Weezer) into smart, sharp-edged millennial indie rock, but "bully" is certainly an apt description for the band's churning guitars, rambunctious rhythms, and tightly coiled intensity. Their debut Feels Like sounds alternately like a balled fist and a fresh bruise.

More crucially, the word "bully" is a perfect distillation of frontwoman Alicia Bognanno's visceral approach to songwriting. She trades in steely observations, raw-nerve confessions, and intense anger directed almost exclusively at herselfalthough a few bystanders and bad exes might get caught in the crossfire. Her voice rises from sugar-sweet to scratchy howl as she bares her most harrowing fears to the world. In other words, Bognanno is her own bully.

Not merely the band's vocalist, songwriter, guitarist, and all-around visionary, she is also Bully's producer and engineer. Her musical life in music is inseparable from her experiences studying audio techniques and technology. Growing up in Minnesota, Bognanno often made up her own lyrics and melodiesnothing so complete as a songbut it wasn't until her senior year of high school that she found an outlet for those creative urges. "I took an audio engineering class at this alternative school," she recalls, adding that sessions were held at the local zoo. "Suddenly, it was like, Wow! I have a way to record stuff. Now I need to figure out how to play an instrument." She learned piano quickly, but guitar was more difficult; she had more fun using Logic Pro X to loop beats for some of her friends who were aspiring rappers.

Audio engineering engaged her in ways that other subjects had not, and Bognanno credits her teacher with recommending an inexpensive four-year Bachelor of Science program at Middle Tennessee State University, about thirty miles south of Nashville. There she immersed herself in courses in recording techniques, music theory and history, even copyright law. She even took another stab at guitar, this time with better results. "I think learning just some basic theory helped a lot, but I think it was because I picked up an electric guitar instead of an acoustic," she explains. "It was a lot more fun."

While the school emphasized digital recording, Boganno became obsessed with analog equipment. Part of the attraction was the richer and roomier sound, which opens up new and livelier textures in the instruments. "It's hard to bust out of what your instructors are showing you and what all your classmates are doing," she says, "but there were two teachers who maintained the tape machines, and they gave me lessons on the mechanics and techniques."

Bognanno used that experience to pursue an internship at Electrical Audio, the Chicago studio complex owned by Steve Albini and host to legendary sessions by some of Bully's heroes and biggest influences: the Breeders, Liz Phair, Superchunk, even the Stooges. When she returned to Tennessee, she started working at a local studio (Battle Tapes), ran sound at one of the best venues in town (the Stone Fox), and formed Bully as essentially a solo project backed by a trio of friends: Stewart Copeland on drums, Clayton Parker on guitar, and Reece Lazarus on bass.

Despite Bognanno's expertise as an audio engineer, the band is less a studio entity than a stage act, one that has quickly developed a reputation for its ferocious live shows (the Nashville Scene named Bully the top local band in its 2014 Best of Nashville issue.) On record, Bognanno strives to retain the band's formidable guitar attack while highlighting her boldly candid lyrics. "At this point in my life I always want everything I make to sound like we're playing live," she explains. "That's why I didn't put any keyboards or any extra stuff on there. Some people don't like that, but I had to go with my gut."

The band recorded live at Electrical Audio, doing as few takes as possible. Once they'd gotten a good performance, the songs were mixed immediately, not merely to save time but to preserve the excitable urgency of the music. Overseeing every part of the process put extra pressure on Bognanno to deliver some truly unbridled vocal performances. She practically screams the lyrics to opener "I Remember," documenting her memories of a curdled romance as the guitars roar and tumble behind her:

I remember showing up at your house

I remember hurting you so much

And I remember the way your sheets smelled!

It made for an intense session. "Stuart was trying to get some footage while we were in the studio, and he said he couldn't be in the same room with me while I was recording those vocals. It was just too intense. I don't even know how it comes out of me."

A deeply personal album by an artist bravely mining her own life, Feels Like is all about trying to figure yourself outabout holding yourself accountable and acting like an adult in a society that doesn't offer very many good examples. It's a coming-of-age album, which only makes Bognanno more relatable. "Sometimes I wonder if people think I'm a complete mess," she says. "It's not easy to put yourself out there like, but it's true. Everyone goes through shit like that."

7:00 pm19:00


Ticket Prices:
$13.00 ADV
$15.00 Day Of
$17.00 Box Office

Not long after he finished recording Beach Music, his seventh full-length and Domino debut, Alex Giannascoli found himself in unfamiliar territory. "I took the record to a studio," he says, "to get it mixed and mastered by some pros. But I was really nervous-usually, I'd just do everything myself and then put it out myself. I have this really precise vision and the best understanding of what I want to do."

Over the course of six self-recorded and mostly self-released LPs, that vision has come to bear in frequently breathtaking, innately melodic forms. As Alex G, the Philadelphian singer-songwriter has built and feverishly shared a body of work unassuming in its presentation but astounding in its depth, a stream of recordings so rich and expansive that settling on a favorite song is nearly impossible: The moment you finally choose one, you discover another you hadn't heard yet. 

Beach Music was written and recorded in Giannascoli's apartment, between the Fall of 2014 and the Spring of 2015, during breaks from touring with the likes of Elvis Depressedly, Cymbals Eat Guitars, and Gardens & Villa. While its predecessors often came in uninterrupted bursts-from his head to his Bandcamp page in a matter of hours and days-Beach Music was shaped in part by Giannascoli adapting to life as a touring musician. Songs were written within months of one another rather than all at once, with influences ranging from noise music to piano-based laments to Southern rock to the rhythmic focus of techno-whatever he happened to be most interested in at the time. "Every song is coming from a different place," he says. "It branches off in all these directions, but it has its own sound. It's not something I do intentionally, but I'm the common thread." 

The result is Giannascoli's most cohesive and beautiful work to date, as heard in the iridescent guitars of "Bug," the starlit whispers of "Mud," and the singularly strange harmonics of "Brite Boy." Some feature parts of songs that he began writing as a kid; all are haunting additions to a songbook whose rewards continue to evolve and multiply with every listen. "I wanted this album to sound really warm and unpretentious and unfiltered," he says. "I wanted to make music that was completely honest, music that was coming really naturally to me. I don't know what or who I am if I'm not writing songs."


Out February 2016 on Domino

When Aaron Maine looks back on his early work as Porches, he's often struck by how sad and angry it can feel. "That music turned out a lot more pessimistic than I intended it to be," he says. "But when I took a sad moment and turned it into a song, it was a cathartic, positive, and clean process. For me, those moments were victories. Feeling better," he adds, "was making a song."

As it turns out, Maine is very good at making songs. Over the last few years, the 27-year-old singer and songwriter has released a wealth of material on a number of influential labels, including singles on Terrible (2014's Prism), Birdtapes (2013's Townie Blunt Guts) and Seagreen (2014's Leather), as well as a beautiful yet crushing full-length on Exploding in Sound (2013's Slow Dance In The Cosmos). And in the process he's become a magnetic live presence while playing out in New York, gaining the notice of discerning listeners and labels alike. February 2016 marks the much-anticipated release of Pool, his debut full-length for Domino and a major step forward for him-as an evolving singer/songwriter, and as a nascent producer. Written and recorded almost entirely in the Manhattan apartment he shares with his partner and frequent collaborator, Greta Kline a.k.a Frankie Cosmos, Pool is an elegantly drawn set of gorgeous, synth-driven pop songs that were influenced, in part, by settling in the city as an artist and a person. "I'm feeling like I'm in a more permanent situation than I've been in before," he says. "There is something special about recording at home. It's why it sounds the way it does. Being able to obsess over it on your own time and being in your own little cube knowing you're surrounded by the city, being able to go so deep into it and to spend hours building it, loving it: all of that allowed me to reflect and focus on things a little closer." 

The album was recorded twice - the first time a crash-course in learning Logic and navigating his first synthesizers and drum machines, the second time starting from scratch with a better hold on the recording process - and eventually mixed by Chris Coady (Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Grizzly Bear, Beach House, Tobias Jesso Jr.) in his Los Angeles studio. Sometime in 2014, Maine, a long-devoted Neil Young fan, began listening to house and electronic music and contemporary pop music more closely and frequently than he ever had before. What followed is a hypnotic and expansive re-articulation of the melancholy we've come to expect, from the pristine harmonies of "Hour" to the undulating R&B of "Underwater" to the Auto-tuned majesty of the title track. "I feel like the lyrics are like mood boards or collages of my experience in New York," he says. "Rather than focusing on a particular incident or story like I have in the past, I wanted to be more abstract, in order to paint a very specific mood: ideas of lightness and darkness, water, air, movement, acceptance and security." The result is a sophisticated and fully immersive listening experience, with Maine's voice at its center. "I'm getting a little older and a little more in touch with my emotions," he adds. "I just wanted to make this album more positive and to make sure that my message was coming across clearly this time. I never wanted my music to bum people out. I feel like I naturally gravitate towards the more melancholic experiences in life, but this time around I tried to dissect those moments and somehow extract what was so beautiful about them to me. With this record, I want people to feel something different, something subtler. I want people to feel dark, beautiful and strong when they hear this new record. I want people to put it on at a party and go wild, to put it on just walking or driving around. I want them to fall in love to this record."

8:00 pm20:00



8:00 pm / $7 Advance / $10 Door / ALL AGES

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ONLY BEAST: "I stumbled across Only Beast simply because of their name and instantly became enamored of their dynamic and incredible front woman Danielle Renee, and the sheer raw power of the rock and roll that comes pouring out of her throat. Let's turn our attention now to another key ingredient [...] drummer John Salinas. The man is like some sort of ordered chaos who beats up and down the sides of songs in a whirlwind of rhythm that always feels like its on the verge of falling apart, the way a death-defying trapeze act does. It never falls, though."

- Jef Rouner, Houston Press

THE WHEEL WORKERS: "They are simultaneously brilliant and down-to-earth, sincerely progressive and catchy as hell, that rare band that can incorporate thoughtful politics into music while keeping things fun and engaging...The Wheel Workers are freaking awesome, and [with Citizens] they’ve gone a very different direction from the path they marched down last time. And it’s good. Oh, is it good." - Jeremy Hart, Space City Rock

"if you happened to miss when I said that this record was top notch, then I’ll just say again that it’s a true masterpiece.." - David Garrick, Free Press Houston

THE BRUNSON THEATER: Texas has a dirty secret creeping up from the Dirty Bay. Although it's affecting the air right's not toxic. The stories you will hear confront a toxic subject but you will likely enjoy the journey whether you're skimming the surface or digging in deep. 

The sound will demand your attention while warming your heart. Even on the haunting songs you'll find yourself singing like a child. An effective and rich bed of harmony supports every note. It seems impossible for a two minute long song spit out 21 chords yet never get in the way of the melody. No, this is not jazz. This music is for everybody! 

This is rock music from a band known as THE BRUNSON THEATER! The music native to Texas new and old covers a wide variety of styles but the forbidden music that's been spinning around the Dirty Bay for a while recently spawned a piece of work incompatible with any southern musical heritage. 

With veteran musician, Ryan Guidry, singing, writing and arranging the album promises to be one of the most melodically infectious and satisfying rock records of the past 15 years. Imagine Peter Gabriel era Genesis sung with Justin Hayward's (Moody Blues) timbre cross pollinating with The Beach Boys and Radiohead into a palatable flowing collection of songs informed by The Beatles.

Musician bios are deceptively difficult to write. Your band bio is your way of introducing yourself to both fans and music industry types, and you need to strike the right balance between providing useful information and going into so much detail no one makes it past the first paragraph. Learn how to put together a band bio that does the job and leaves people interested in learning more about you. 
1. Start off strong with an intriguing opening paragraph. 
Venues and bookers are very busy snorting cocaine, so they probably will not read your entire bio (have you heard about the club booker who made it out of high school? Me neither). It is important to start strong and grab the reader's interest. Introduce all of the band members and begin describing your sound immediately.

2. Turn the bio into a compelling story. 
Tell a story about your band. Make it something unique, funny, or memorable. Use fun and descriptive words to describe your music and bandmates. I think autogyro is a funny word. How about you?

3. Limit the biography to no more than a page in length....OOOOPS! 
Your band bio should be brief and well-written. No more than a couple paragraphs and definitely not more than a page.

4. Include all press mentions and highlights. 
You definitely want to highlight all of your greatest successes in your bio. Include any important blog or site mentions, awards, album releases, and notable performances.  
5. Proofread for spelling and grammar errors and have someone else double check it. 
Read through and edit your bio before sending it anywhere. Take out unnecessary sentenecs and check all spelling and grammar. Pass it over to a friend who is great with words and writing to double check it for you. 

6. Update the bio regularly as new things happen.  
As you move on and achieve more accomplishments, add or lose band members, or anything else you need to remember to update your bio accordingly. Remove outdated news whenever you add a more recent bit of information.

8:00 pm20:00



DOORS @ 8, SHOW @ 9 / $8 / ALL AGES

Grisbee is a folk-rock band from Houston, TX that formed in 2012 when singer-songwriter Jeremy Grisbee moved to town from Springfield, MO. After playing a few solo shows in the city, Jeremy encountered a handful of talented musicians who were interested in seeing what they could bring to a batch of songs he’d written. These songs would eventually become Grisbee’s debut album, Sail Another Day (2015), a brutally honest — but ultimately optimistic — document of the extreme highs and lows a relationship can experience. Though the tracks still maintain the folk roots common to singer-songwriters, the band's sound is stretched in a few diverse ways due to the unique backgrounds of the players. Seth Plemmons' lead guitar lines reflect his background playing country and rock licks. Kate Wasserman’s mandolin work hews closest to the Americana sound of the Ozarks that initially birthed the songs, but her backing vocals lend an ethereal quality atypical to the genre, ghosting in the background as if at times giving a parallel take — with a subtle spin — on Jeremy’s stories. Bassist Jack Gordon and drummer Gus Alvarado, veterans of a handful of Houston hard rock bands, bring a focused intensity that provides a strong backbone for the songs. These elements combine on the album and live to provide an energy and range only possible when a talented bunch of musicians truly feel at home with each other as a band.

“Hippie album as clear as water. ‘Water’ sounds like Thom Yorke on LSD, ‘Belly of a Man’ like an update of Tim Buckley.” – Rolling Stone

“reminiscent of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and The Band” – Kulturspiegel

Adam Bricks is an unabashed, head-held-high folksinger, the kind of musician and songwriter that used to push music forwards but these days gets relegated to the dingy club while vapid electronic beats bounce plasticized pop mannequins around on stage. Now, with that said, he’s decidedly not a countryish, roaming-through-the-woods kind of folkie — City Songs isn’t Fleet Foxes or For Emma, Forever Ago, and thank God for that.

From the NYC Antifolk scene to Houston's tight knit growing music community, Adam Bricks is known for his intense story based songwriting. Since his first release, "Clock Crash EP", in 2011 he has played throughout the east coast as well as in his home state of Texas. Last April he put out his first full length, "City Songs", a tribute to his home-city of Houston as well as his NYC Stomping grounds.

10:30 pm22:30


Friday, November 20th
Walter's Downtown
8pm, $10

All Ages Hardcore Show

Coming all the way from Troy, NY to kick your fucking asses



SHADOW OF DOUBT (San Antonio, members of Hardside, Mind's Eye, ex-Bitter End)


7:00 pm19:00


Buy Tickets

Ticket Prices:
$15.00 ADV
$15.00 Door

This show is All Ages


"The funny thing about belonging to a scene," begins singer/gui- tarist Frank Iero, "is that at a certain point, there becomes all these factions. Are you pop-punk? Are you emo? Are post-hardcore? Hardcore? Are you a fuckin' hipster? In my last band, these factions were waiting to see, 'What are these guys? They came from here, they're not really this, we need to label them somehow.' The reality was had we decided we were something, that scene wouldn't have wanted us anyway. It wasn't like getting picked for a kickball team in elementary school. It was like, 'Well, you've got to go to a team, so you better decide soon. But none of us fuckin' want you.' So we decided to do our own thing." 

Doing your own thing is a modus operandi that's worked well for Iero, the former guitarist in the groundbreaking outfit My Chemical Romance, who was responsible for bringing (and maintaining) an old-school punk energy to that band's bigger-than-life-and-twice-as-heavy rock vision. After 10 years, four albums and rounds of incessant touring, MCR quietly adjourned in March of 2013. But the creatively restless guitarist has always held a hardcore work ethic, a mindset that helped propel "Stomachaches," his proper debut full-length on Staple Records. Well, that and his rebellious lower intestines. 

"I'm plagued with a bacterial overgrowth of the lower intestines," he says. "When those levels get out of wack, I experience digestive problems and pain. My levels are naturally out of wack, so every few months, I take a bout of antibiotics that kill everything and then I start from scratch. When normal people are digesting food, they don't notice it. When I'm digesting things, it causes me pain." He begins to laugh. "It's like saying, 'Every time I breathe, it hurts.' There's not a day that goes by when I don't feel nauseous: On my good days, I feel like a mess. I'm sure a lot of it is psychosomatic, because I'm such a nervous wreck, no matter what. For me, if I'm making something new, whether it's a song or a poem or a short story or a painting, that's what gets my mind off of how I feel. That's the thought process behind the entire record." 

"My definition of a punk-rock mindset is that you do what you do because you have to do it," he continues. "Not because of who you are trying to please or what you're trying to make. These are things that need to be done for your sanity, for you to stay alive. I don't know if that's punk-rock or not. I'm a very sensitive person, and for me to say, 'I don't care about what you think,' well, that's not entirely true. Ultimately, it doesn't change what I want to do, but if you have something terrible to say to me, it's going to hurt because I'm a sensitive person. It's not going to affect the outcome." He beg

10:55 pm22:55



Buy Tickets:

Ticket Prices:
$18.00 Day Of
$20.00 Box Office

This show is All Ages

- Modern Baseball
- Pup, Jeff Rosenstock, Tiny Moving Parts

Modern Baseball formed at Drexel University, Philadelphia in 2012 where songwriters Brendan Lukens and Jake Ewald began writing catchy pop-punk-influenced indie rock, with nods to the likes of Say Anything and Motion City Soundtrack alongside the lyrical nous of Dashboard Confessional and the wit of the Front Bottoms. The high school friends started out as an acoustic act, but after they met Sean Huber (drums) and Ian Farmer (bass) at a typical college house party, they became a four-piece. Lukens and Ewald were in the midst of recording their debut record, Sports, at the university studios when Huber and Farmer joined, and it was released soon afterwards. The album quickly gained local traction and eventually, in 2013, online buzz started to pick up for their lo-fi songs that captured the awkwardness of teenagers surrounded by social media, and bungling relationships with girls. The quartet remained at university while taking time out when they could to tour, but that changed when they were offered a support slot with fellow Philly-based outfit the Wonder Years and they penned a deal with Run for Cover Records. They returned to the studio later that year to record their follow-up, You're Gonna Miss It All, which appeared in early 2014. ~ Scott Kerr

8:00 pm20:00






Strange Wilds is a musical power-trio from Olympia, Washington.

There are three members: Allen, who plays drums; Sean, who plays bass; and Steven, who sings and plays the guitar. There is also a freight train, several buzzsaws, a banshee, and some heavy, heavy Pacific doom-and-gloom up in the mix.

The group formed in 2012, when Steven met Sean while Sean’s band from Boise was playing a gig in a house where Steven lived. They became friends, and several months later Steven called Sean, who had just relocated to Olympia for college, to form the band. They were called Wet, and gigged around the West Coast as a four-piece. Allen was added as a full-time member in 2014 after a line-up change, and the band changed its name to Strange Wilds to release a 4-song EP and tour immediately. Sub Pop came calling, and signed the band last fall. The band is now set to release its full-length debut, Subjective Concepts, July 24th, 2015.

Doors: 8 / Show: 9
$7 Advance / $10 Door

8:00 pm20:00






Ed Schrader and Devlin Rice are Ed Schrader's Music Beat from the fair city of Baltimore MD. In 2008/09 many had seen Ed "live" with just a floor tom, one light, plenty of jokes, and commanding voice. This era often left people with a sense that they had just seen a man unhinged trying to tell them something sacred in the form of a song, or something, they weren't too sure what they saw. After a few tours on his own, in 2010 Ed asked Devlin to help him expand the songs with his limited knowledge of the bass guitar. Now the "live" show is one guy playing a drum with a light shining, singing his ass off and another dude with a bass, in the dark laughing at the other guy's jokes. This era (which still continues) tends to leave people with that same fascination of the sacred unhinged but now it seems a little less scary, more familiar and they can can bring their dates to see this "cool band that you might not have heard of". 

This union shortly brought about the release of Jazz Mind on Load Records which featured collaborations with Randy Randall of No Age and Baltimore sound gurus Matmos. Jazz Mind captured the raw and jarring "live" show with songs that seem equally loud and destructive, pensive and haunting. Since the albums release the duo have been touring non-stop through North America and Europe, by themselves mostly but have also been seen in opening slots with Dan Deacon, Future Islands and hardcore luminaries Ceremony.

Party Jail picks up where Jazz Mind left off with a greater focus on making the listener aware that Ed Schrader's Music Beat are not nut jobs who just play their best guess at punk. They wish to reveal that they are secretly a band that write pop songs, whether you know it or not.

Doors: 8 / Show: 9
$7 Advance / $10 Door

7:00 pm19:00



Doors at 7:00 pm / $10 Advance / $15 Door / All Ages

Formed in 1967 as an electronic rock duo featuring Dan Taylor on drums and Simeon on a homemade synthesizer consisting of 12 oscillators and an assortment of sound filters, telegraph keys, radio parts, lab gear and a variety of second hand electronic junk, the band quickly gained a reputation as New York's leading underground musical expression. The photo below is of the band's first gig, before 30,000 fans in NY's Central Park. First full-length album was released in 1968 on KAPP Records. The self titled album rode the Billboard Magazine Top 100 list for 10 weeks. The second full length album was released in 1969, titled CONTACT. A national tour was launched by the band's recording popularity. A third album was recorded in 1970, but not released when KAPP folded.Without a record label the band disbanded, and, except for an occasional bootleg release, was not heard from again until 1994, when a German label named TRC, without license, re-released the first two albums in a double CD version, complete with poster. Since then numerous artists around the world have released covers, tributes and samplings of Silver Apples material. In 1996, Simeon re-activated Silver Apples, recording and performing with many musician friends and admirers. On March 10, 2005, original drummer, Danny Taylor, passed away of a heart attack in Kingston, New York. He was 56 years old. Working as a solo performer, with Danny's drum sounds recreated by electronic means, Simeon has continued the Silver Apples live concerts with performances literally all over the world. Currently Simeon is still recording and performing as a solo.

Formed in 1967 as an electronic rock duo featuring Dan Taylor on drums and Simeon on a homemade synthesizer consisting of 12 oscillators and an assortment of sound filters, telegraph keys, radio parts, lab gear and a variety of second hand electronic junk, the band quickly gained a reputation as New York's leading underground musical expression. The photo below is of the band's first gig, before 30,000 fans in NY's Central Park.

First full-length album was released in 1968 on KAPP Records. The self titled album rode the Billboard Magazine Top 100 list for 10 weeks.

The second full length album was released in 1969, titled CONTACT. A national tour was launched by the band's recording popularity. A third album was recorded in 1970, but not released when KAPP folded.Without a record label the band disbanded, and, except for an occasional bootleg release, was not heard from again until 1994, when a German label named TRC, without license, re-released the first two albums in a double CD version, complete with poster. Since then numerous artists around the world have released covers, tributes and samplings of Silver Apples material.

In 1996, Simeon re-activated Silver Apples, recording and performing with many musician friends and admirers. On March 10, 2005, original drummer, Danny Taylor, passed away of a heart attack in Kingston, New York. He was 56 years old. Working as a solo performer, with Danny's drum sounds recreated by electronic means, Simeon has continued the Silver Apples live concerts with performances literally all over the world. Currently Simeon is still recording and performing as a solo.

8:00 pm20:00


Buy tickets:

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm / ALL AGES

Alligator Years expands upon the charming surfy haze of Twinsmith's 2013 eponymous album and "Honestly" single, with the band pushing themselves musically while moving toward a more dynamic pop sound. Each diverse track is imbued with an individual voice and style, and ranges from propulsive, melodic rock ("Seventeen") to buoyantly playful pop ("Alligator Years") from soaring, sing-along retro pop ("Is It Me") to sumptuous, evocative new wave ("Constant Love"); from shimmery, summery pop ("Said and Done", "Haunts") to moody, slowburning ballads ("Dust", "Carry On"). There's a youthful sense of longing and exploration that permeates the album, which reflects on the highs and lows, advantages and disadvantages, hopes and fears of 20-something life with crafty, unassuming depth. Not just any band can examine anxiety, uncertainty, and commitment through tales of homicidal girlfriends and zombie apocalypses with such aplomb.

Written throughout 2014, Alligator Years was recorded in Omaha, NE and Des Moines, IA, with the production team of The Envy Corps' Luke Pettipoole and Brandon Darner, who's also worked with Imagine Dragons, as well as Micah Natera.

Twinsmith is: Jordan Smith (vocals, guitar), Oliver Morgan (drums), Matt Regner (guitar, synths), and Bill Sharp (bass).

10:00 pm22:00


Buy Tickets:

Ticket Prices:
$10.00 ADV
$12.00 Day Of

This show is All Ages

- Lost Element
- Sick Of Sarah

Hailing from Houston, TX, Lost Element has quickly established itself as one of the most promising new Alt/Pop artists on the scene. Their new single "Twenty Five," which layers crunchy guitars with a good time summer vibe sing-along chorus, is set to release in April of 2015. Behind Lost Element's sound are the three core writing members Omar Lopez (Lead Vocals), Brian Barrett (Drums and Backup Vocals), andTrace Sisson (Guitar and backup Vocals), along with youthful dynamic duo of Kenny Conlon (Bass) and Frank Vazquez (Guitar and backup Vocals).

Lost Element has built a strong and devoted fan base in Houston, playing large music festivals including 94.5 The Buzz‘s Weenie Roast, supporting Awolnation and Hoobastank as well as opening for many national acts at clubs and theatres in the area. Critical acclaim includes their winning the "New band of the Year" award at the 2011 Texas Buzz Music Awards.

"Twenty Five" is the first single from their new album, "Stereo Dream", which is set to release this fall. It's produced by up and comer Bryce Bordone. The new album shows a marked evolution in their sound, presenting a dynamic mix of new wave pop, alternative drive, and indie hooks.

8:00 pm20:00



What awaits you when the needle drops on Dereconstructed, the new album by Lee Bains lll & the Glory Fires? Nothing less than pure fucking heaven, that's what.

Consider the record's opener, "The Company Man." It revs up with a riff sleazy enough to clog Rod Stewart's stomach pump as an incantation that only a Yellowhammer can truly understand is bellowed and then screamed. Before you know it, the joint is hotter than a Birmingham soaking pit while you, the listener, are reminded, lest you forget, don't ever trust the company man.

No shit.

Dereconstructed is a careening, road raging, all night party of a record. Informed by a distinctly southern hoodoo, it is a master class in authentic Gulf Coast choogle. Having cut his teeth in the Dexateens, Lee Bains lll has been properly schooled in how to throw down, so much so that even his hyper literate musings are no match for the blown out distortion that gives this record its blistering urgency.

Songs like "The Kudzu and the Concrete," "Dirt Track" and the roaring, blissfully shambolic title track could be anthems looking for a stadium, but they're also reminders as to why Lee Bains lll & the Glory Fires are such a formidable party machine. If your hometown is graced with a scuzzy dive and a few warm bodies to populate it, you'd best believe that the Glory Fires have been there, or are on their way back.

Doors: 8 / Show: 9
$7 Advance / $10 Door

7:00 pm19:00





Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm
$12 advance / $15 door

For Noah Gundersen, the past few years have brought about immense growth and change, both as an artist and as a young man grappling with issues of identity and independence. It should come as little surprise, then, that his stunning new album, 'Carry The Ghost,' is so heavily influenced by existential philosophy. What's so striking, though, is hearing a 25-year-old articulate such weighty themes, packaging them into heartbreakingly gorgeous melodies with a plainspoken language that cuts to the quick upon first listen. Then again, Noah Gundersen has never aimed for ordinary. 

Though only a little more than a year has passed since the 2014 release of 'Ledges,' 'Carry The Ghost' finds an older, more sophisticated Gundersen attempting the difficult work of unraveling our purpose here, searching for answers about the nature of man and the meaning of our relationships. Gundersen came to an understanding of himself as the sum of his experiences, a view he embraces as a positive one and which led him to delve into the works of existentialist writers and philosophers like Ortega. For Gundersen, the personal history that shapes each and every one of us is the titular ghost, and it's the thread that ties the entire record together.

The album's more ambitious scale showcases a natural evolution following the success of 'Ledges,' which earned raves everywhere from NPR's World Café to CBS Saturday Morning. Hailed as a "powerful debut" by SPIN, the record delivered on the promise of a string of previous EPs, which poetically tackled issues of faith and doubt and loss and desire as Gundersen transitioned into adulthood. It earned him a devoted national fan base, with many introduced to his music through placements on popular television series like 'Sons of Anarchy,' where his introspective and brooding songs proved to be an invaluable piece of the storytelling.

With 'Carry The Ghost,' Gundersen once again looked inward to find inspiration. "This album grew out of a desire to know myself, to know how I was supposed to live," he explains. "And in that process, I realized that maybe there is no 'supposed to be.' The concept of 'Carry The Ghost' is that we're made by our experiences and to accept that instead of fighting it. The last several years have been a process of accepting things as they are and to not see them as so black and white or right or wrong, to accept that we're not made to be a certain way, but that we are involved in an ongoing process of becoming."

Recorded at Seattle's Litho Studio, 'Carry The Ghost' explores issues of self-discovery and existentialism with an erudite sophistication across 13 magnificent tracks. Collaborating more than ever before with his touring band—which includes his sister Abby and brother Jonathan—Gundersen set out to push boundaries and confound expectations, experimenting with tone and structure and creating rich sonic textures that ebb and flow beneath his stirring, solemn voice.

The album opens with "Slow Dancer," a haunting piano meditation on the anger and frustration that can often be a part of the process of healing from a broken heart. "Light me up again if it makes you feel free," he sings. Dramatic as it can be, this is not an album about conflict, but rather acceptance and understanding. "Why try and fix it?" he asks on "The Difference." "Maybe you were made this way / Maybe the pieces were intentionally different." Later in the album, he strives to "understand the space between the man and the mirror," and on "Show Me The Light," he looks to his first love and recognizes, "You were the worst and the best thing that happened to me."

"With 'Show Me The Light' in particular, there's a dualism that shaped me and I'm ultimately grateful for, even though it was painful," says Gundersen. "There are good things to be taken from most bad things. Again, that's the idea of embracing our history."

"There's a social and religious tendency to see ourselves as inherently broken and in need of fixing," he continues, "and this is me challenging that idea, saying, 'Maybe we were made this way and maybe we are not actually broken and maybe it's okay that we don't have the answers.'"

While Biblical references have frequently played a role in Gundersen's songwriting, he casts off his last subconscious bonds to religion in "Empty From The Start," which plays out as something of an existentialist manifesto. "This is all we have / This is all we are / Blood and bones no holy ghost / Empty from the start," he sings. But rather than leading him to embrace nihilism, the revelation causes Gundersen to find more meaning than ever in humankind, and brings out a new degree of selflessness, as he concludes, "The only thing worth loving more than me is loving you." 

"If we are ultimately alone and there is no God and no one will ever truly know what's going on inside of us, I think the most valuable thing we can do is to at least attempt to know someone," he explains. "And that's what I think love is, whether it's romantic love or familial or simply friendship or companionship. To make someone else feel slightly less alone, and in that process become slightly less alone yourself, that to me seems like one of the few truly valuable things that we can do in this life."

The concepts of value and meaning are clearly ones that occupied much of Gundersen's consciousness during the writing of the album. He tackles the notions on "Selfish Art," asking, "Am I giving all that I can give? Am I earning the right to live?" 

"I think that's a question that I've come to terms with more recently," he says. "I realized while writing these songs that so much of what I do in life as a professional artist, the idea of getting paid to talk about your feelings, is inherently selfish and narcissistic. While I do believe in the transformative nature of art, I have to be conscious of not becoming self-obsessed, which can come so easily."

It's a difficult balance, but perhaps the greatest triumph of 'Carry The Ghost' is that Gundersen pulls it off with a seemingly effortless refinement. This is the sound of a songwriter looking inward to look outward, accepting his limitations to liberate himself. It's the sound of an artist pushing himself mentally and musically to understand his place in the world and seize control of it, and in doing so, illuminating a portrait in which others may see themselves. If Ortega is to be believed, 'Carry The Ghost' is the sum sound of Noah Gundersen's past, but it's also nothing short of a thrilling preview of his future.